Reiser: Kids better off without mother

Hans Reiser told his mother 20 days after his estranged wife Nina disappeared that he wished she'd been put in jail and their children would be better off without her, according to a tape played at his trial today.

In the third day of his opening statement in Reiser's case, Alameda County Deputy District Attorney Paul Hora played for jurors a tape of a phone call Reiser, a 43-year-old computer engineer, made to his mother, Beverly Palmer, on Sept. 23, 2006, 20 days after Nina Reiser, 31, was last seen alive.

In the phone call, Reiser said of Nina “she really was nuts,” “looks for every possible way she can screw me” and alleged that the couple's son Rory, now 8, was suffering from various illnesses “because she hated me and Rory was a proxy for me.”

Reiser alleged that Nina once kicked him and then called police in an alleged ploy to get him arrested but when police arrived they wanted to arrest Nina, apparently for instigating the incident.

But Reiser told his mother, who was present in court today while the tape was played, that he talked policeout of arresting her.

However, he said he had second thoughts and, “I would advise any man getting a divorce that if your wife kicks you and calls police you need to get her arrested.”

Reiser said, “It would have gone better if she'd gone to jail.”

After his mother told Reiser that Nina “didn't deserve whatever happened to her” even if she wasn't a perfect wife or mother, Reiser said, “I think my children shouldn't be endangered by her.”

Hans Reiser, and Nina, met in Russia, where she was born and was trained as a gynecologist and where he did business for his software company, Namesys Inc.

They were married in 1999 and had two children but separated in 2004 and were undergoing contentious divorce proceedings at the time she disappeared but the divorce wasn't finalized.

Reiser's lawyer, William DuBois, was scheduled to present his opening statement later today.

— Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

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