Redwood City may seek tennis court reservation fee

Redwood City tennis players hoping to reserve one of the city’s courts may soon have to fork over some cash.

The Park and Recreation commission will consider changes to the reservation process and prices because of the growing popularity of the city’s courts.

Redwood City does not currently charge a fee to use one of its dozen tennis courts.

The city does not have a recreational tennis program, but local tennis clubs, teams affiliated with the U.S. Tennis Association and residents looking to drop in for a match are competing for court space, parks superintendent Chris Beth said.

“There are more requests,” he said. “It’s not critical — people are not at each other’s throats — but we are getting lots of calls and it would be good to have a formal process in place.”

Currently, USTA teams and clubs such as the Redwood Shores Tennis Club send a request by mail listing the dates for which they would like to reserve courts, according to Beth.

Beth said a potential fee would be nominal, but an amount to reserve a court had not been decided. The process will be discussed at a parks commission meeting later this month.

Beth said because of the sport’s growing popularity, his department needs a formulaic way to accept or deny reservations. The fee, if one is approved, would pay for administrative costs.

Beth said the primary reason to discuss tennis courts is to put a procedure in place for the 20 USTA and local clubs looking to reserve one.

Karen Brodersen, president of the Redwood Shores Tennis Club, said although she understands the courts are becoming increasingly popular, a fee would hurt the community clubs, which are run by volunteers.

“If they start charging to reserve, the rates we charge for tournaments would have to be raised,” she said. “It could be tremendously high for some people.”

Brodersen said the club currently charges $10 per player to participate in a monthly tournament, but that fee could at least double if the city decides to charge.

“We’re not a pay-to-play sort of group,” she said. “We have all different skills and all different ages.”

Brodersen said the city should charge competitive clubs to use the courts, but residents should be able to use the parks without paying a fee.

 “We play tennis socially,” she said. “We encourage people to go out and use the city parks.”

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Just Posted

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Speaker of the Parliament of Mongolia Gombojav Zandanshatar said his country and San Francisco face similar challenges on issues including COVID recovery and climate change.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Mongolian leaders meet with tech, film leaders on city tour

‘I really want San Franciscans to meet the new Mongolian generation’

Most Read