Recycled water turns grass green

After the Presidents Cup comes to a close at Harding Park, work will begin on a project between Daly City and San Francisco that will bring recycled water to the famed golf course.

Recycled water is wastewater from homes and businesses — from sinks and toilets — that is cleaned at a treatment facility for reuse.

On Monday, there will be a public hearing before Daly City’s Sanitation District Board to discuss the environmental impacts of the Harding Park Recycled Water Project, which will include construction of an underground storage tank, a pump station and a nearly one-mile long pipeline to connect to Daly City’s recycled water system.

The work is not expected to close the golf course, according to officials with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which oversees a water system that serves The City and other Bay Area customers.

Using recycled water for irrigation will help preserve the area’s drinking water supply, according to SFPUC spokeswoman Suzanne Gautier.

Daly City’s treatment facility already supplies recycled water to several private golf courses in San Francisco, including the Olympic Club, the San Francisco Golf Club and the Lake Merced Golf Club.

Although Harding Park — a public course owned by the city of San Francisco — does not currently use recycled water to irrigate its course, when the park was renovated in 2003, it was outfitted with two different sprinkler heads to accommodate recycled water in the future, Gautier said.

“It’s exciting for us to say soon we will have recycled water on our golf course,” she said.

Harding Park’s recycled water system will be connected to the Olympic Club’s system. The proposed site for Harding’s underground tank — which will have a 700,000 gallon capacity — is at Lake Merced Boulevard at Higuera Avenue.

Patrick Sweetland, director of Daly City’s water and wastewater resources department, said the city’s facility has enough capacity to serve existing users as well as Harding Park.

“It won’t interrupt our service to the Olympic Club,” Sweetland said. “If we didn’t have the capacity, we wouldn’t be doing it because it would hurt the other users.”

Once completed, Harding Park will get an average of 390,000 million gallons of recycled water, according to Gautier.

According to Gautier, the SFPUC contributed $1 million when Daly City renovated the plant for recycled water.

If the environmental documents are approved Monday, San Francisco can move forward with the project and put out a bid for construction, Sweetland said.

Gautier said construction is scheduled for April 2010 and will last until August 2011. Roughly $6.4 million has been set aside for the project.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com
 

Daly City’s recycled water facility and the proposed Harding Park project, by the numbers:

2.77 million gallons

Maximum amount of recycled water the facility is allowed to produce per day

1.62 million gallons

Average daily supply during the week with the highest recycled water demands in 2006

0.78 million gallons

Estimated average daily demand for Harding Park in a peak week

4,224 feet

Length of proposed recycled water pipeline for Harding Park (400 feet in Daly City and
3,284 feet in San Francisco)

700,000 gallons

Volume of proposed underground recycled water storage tank for Harding Park

2,000 gallons

Amount of recycled water that could be pumped by the minute through the proposed Harding Park system

Source: San Francisco Public Utilities Commission
 

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