Rec fees increase to help budget

Residents will now have to pay more to use some of the city’s recreation facilities or to have city staff on hand for trips and events.

Select fees for facilities and programs most used by residents were increased as part of a revenue-generating effort for the city.

Those who use Gellert Park picnic tables, take city-sponsored senior trips and use city recreation facilities will experience fee increases. 

Officials expect to recoup roughly $10,000 annually due to the fee boosts.

The increase was intended to help offset some of the money taken from the general fund for the facilities, according to Assistant City Manager Kerry Burns.

“The increase more accurately reflects the cost it takes to provide service,” she said. “Over time, we’ve subsidized the cost using the general fund.”

Because the new fees were adopted by resolution, Burns said, they are effective immediately.

Daly City is facing an $8 million deficit. As a result, city officials have also distributed a survey to residents to gather input on what services should be cut next fiscal year. The City has an operating budget of $98 million.

Its roughly 500 employees were also asked to take mandatory furloughs this fiscal year to help with the budget crisis.

The largest rate increase approved by the City Council will affect nonresidents who rent Daly City facilities. In addition to facility costs, the $50 nonresident fee has gone up to $75.

That means someone who lives outside Daly City who wanted to rent the picnic shelter in Gellert Park will now have to pay $175 instead of $100, as a result of the increases to the facility fee and the nonresident fee. Residents looking to rent the same space would now pay $100 rather than $75.

The cost to cover employees who help seniors with reservations, registration and travel for events went from $3 to $5 per trip, on top of the fee charged for the trip itself.

The increases will cover the direct and indirect cost to deliver the programs, Burns said.

Citizens will pay more for some Parks and Recreation Department services, but the money saved will spare the city from taking from the general fund for the agency, thus sparing cuts to other city services, she said.

City staff and the council considered community need and accessibility when setting the new prices and fees, Burns said.

“We know more people are out of work and our usage has increased,” she said.

 

Cost increases

Daly City’s Parks and Recreation Department is tightening its budget and raising a host of fees.

Trips for senior residents

  • From: $3 for staff added to cost of trip
  • To: $5 added to cost of trip

Facility staff/fee for nonprofits

  • From: $20/hour
  • To: $25/hour

Nonresident rental fee

  • From: $50, in addition to facility fee
  • To: $75, in addition to facility fee

Gellert Picnic Shelter facility fee — residents

  • From: $50
  • To: $75

Gellert Picnic Shelter facility fee — nonresidents*

  • From: $75 
  • To: $100

Employee rentals 

  • From: 50 percent discount off hourly fee
  • To: Restrict discount to Sunday-Friday

Special event permit fee

  • From: $25 
  • To: $100, with $250 cleanup/security deposit

* Does not include additional nonresident rental fee

Source: Daly City

Bay Area NewsfeeincreaseLocal

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read