Re-evaluation of CCSF pitched during trial’s closing arguments

City College of San Francisco may know as early as next month whether it will qualify for restoration status or be re-evaluated by the commission that voted to revoke the school's accreditation last year.

The latter option was requested by the City Attorney's Office during closing arguments Tuesday in its trial against the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. City attorneys have alleged that CCSF was unfairly evaluated prior to the commission's efforts to revoke the school's accreditation. CCSF remains open and accredited.

“The proper remedy for these violations is to set aside the 2012 and '13 decisions [that led to the threatening of CCSF's accreditation] and have City College be evaluated anew,” Deputy City Attorney Sarah Eisenberg told Judge Curtis Karnow.

But attorneys for the ACCJC said in their closing arguments that restoration status, a newly created policy by the commission that would give the school two more years to entirely comply with accrediting requirements, would provide CCSF with the same opportunity the City Attorney's Office seeks: for the college to maintain its accreditation.

“The termination date will be rescinded effective at the end of the restoration policy. That's what the city attorney is asking for today,” attorney Kenneth Keller told Karnow.

Eisenberg, however, countered that restoration status would not “wipe out the scarlet T” of accreditation termination. That “will be part of CCSF's permanent record,” Eisenberg argued.

Karnow said Tuesday he will likely release a draft proposed statement of his decision in January. The City Attorney's Office and ACCJC will each have two weeks to file objections before Karnow issues a final written decision.

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior CollegesBay Area NewsCity Attorney’s OfficeCity College of San Franciscoeducation

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