Rain to continue into next week

The intermittent rain that has residents carrying both coats and sunglasses lately will continue for at least another week, as weather systems swing through Northern California en route to the Pacific Northwest.

“Friday morning looks to be a period of rain, with that rain continuing through the afternoon, but it will taper off over the evening,” said meteorologist Dan Gudgel of the National Meteorological Service.

Next week’s weather will be “unsettled,” and may include short bouts of rain early in the week.

Rain is welcome in local reservoirs and lagoons. The dry summer led to calls for water rationing in the South Bay, and voluntary conservation around The City and the Peninsula.

Michael Carlin, assistant general manager for water at the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, said the SFPUC will still drain local reservoirs to prepare for rainy season to prevent overflows or flooding. San Francisco and Peninsula water users are going into this season with more water than in 2004, the driest recent year that had half of the normal precipitation for the year. This past year had 70 percent of normal levels.

Though flooding is not a risk because rain is light, SFPUC spokesman Tony Winnicker said the agency’s two catch-basin crews are starting to clear drains and ditches, and began staffing an overnight on-call crew for rainy nights.

The SFPUC’s 4th annual “Sandbag Saturday,” on Oct. 20 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Residents can pick up free sandbags at the Public Works Department Yard, 2323 Cesar Chavez St.

jgoldman@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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