Quarry housing opponents’ coffers nearly empty

Pacifica residents’ group is going up against big money

PACIFICA — Pacifica residents fighting the redevelopment of Rockaway Quarry have less than $600 going into the final month of the campaign, while their opponent, a developer, has racked up more than $500,000 in outstanding debtsince July while raising zero dollars locally.

Campaign finance statements were due yesterday for the campaigns for and against Measure L, which allows up to 350 units of residential housing on the property.

Pacifica Today and Tomorrow, which opposes the development, raised $1,779 since Aug. 1 and has spent $1,192,86, mostly on signs and fundraising events. All told, the group enters the final month — the most important month — of the campaign with $586.14.

“We’re just local hometown folks putting together a few signs. We have no money,” said former Pacifica Mayor Peter Loeb.

Loeb debated R. Don Peebles, the Miami-based hotelier looking to bring a mixed-use development to the 85 acres of Rockaway Quarry, in August before a standing-room only crowd at the Sharp Park Golf Course.

The Rockaway Quarry Committee has spent so much they’re $526,000 in debt as they begin the last month of the campaign. The committee raised nearly $364,000 from July 1 until Sept. 30, none of it from local donors.

It has also spent almost $700,000 during that time, including $67,876 on local cable-TV air-time and $50,000 on production of the ads. The committee begins the final month of the campaign with $23,140 in cash-on-hand.

A Peebles affiliate, Rockaway Beach, LTD., was the source of all of the committee’s funding in the last three months.

dsmith@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read