PUC's Leal hit by car in front of City Hall

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission General Manager Susan Leal has been hospitalized this afternoon after being struck by a vehicle in front of San Francisco City Hall, an SFPUC spokesman said.

SFPUC spokesman Tony Winniker said Leal was thrown about 30 feet but doctors so far have not found any broken bones or other internal injuries, and she is now recovering at San Francisco General Hospital.

“She’s stable. She’s alert. She’s coherent,” Winniker said. “She’s actually in good spirits in spite of taking a pretty tough hit,” he added.

The accident took place in the Polk Street crosswalk just before noon, according to Winniker.

He said a woman driving a minivan told police she did not see Leal in the crosswalk, and pulled over afterward. The driver was quite shaken as well, and was also taken to a hospital for observation, Winniker said.

According to Winniker, Leal will be held overnight for observation at the hospital.

“She will be quite bruised from the impact and the landing,” Winniker said, adding, “It could have been much worse.”

Winniker said Leal is “eager to get back to work as soon as possible” and is “grateful for the quality of care at San Francisco General.”

Leal, a former San Francisco supervisor, was appointed to the SFPUC in 2004.

Bay City News

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