Public housing in Hunters Point to have soaring views

Six residential towers will stretch up to 65 feet above the highest peaks of Hunters Point providing enviable views of The City and Bay, under newly released redevelopment plans to rebuild the public-housing site for low-income as well as market-rate residents.

Currently, 154 of the 267 decrepit public-housing units at the hilly site within The City’s southeast area are rented from the San Francisco Housing Authority, according to city documents. The rest sit empty.

Plans to demolish, redesign and rebuild the 20-acre site were reviewed by the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency on Tuesday.

In its place, a 740-unit project is scheduled to become the first of eight redevelopment projects funded through Hope SF, a program championed by Mayor Gavin Newsom, that will use the money from market-rate units to help fund the rebuilt projects.

Along with 267 public-housing units planned for the rebuilt neighborhood, there will be 315 market-rate units, 141 below-market-rate rental and ownership units, and at least 17 units built by Habitat For Humanity, plans show.

The different unit types will be “seamlessly” integrated, according to Anne Torney, with San Francisco-based development company Solomon E.T.C.

Many of the units will be contained within six high-rise towers built atop hills, according to Torney. A community building will be housed on the central hill at the heart of Hunters Point, she said.

Narrow, tree-lined streets in the redeveloped site will follow a classical grid-pattern that connect with roads in surrounding neighborhoods — a vast contrast to the current street-design that follows the circular contours of the land, according to Torney. The project will also include a trio of parks.

Work on the redevelopment effort is expected to begin late next year with demolition of the existing units, if planning efforts go smoothly, according to agency project manager Erin Carson.

Existing tenants will have the opportunity to move into units that are currently vacant when their units are torn down as they await their new homes, Carson said.

Construction of the redesigned neighborhood is expected to finish by 2015, according to Carson.

City officials will need to approve plans for the project and create new height laws for the area, according to agency planner Tom Evans.

jupton@examiner.com

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