Public comment period extended for proposal to require permits for fires at Ocean Beach

The public comment period for a proposal to require permits for fires at San Francisco’s Ocean Beach and impose seasonal restrictions has been extended by two weeks to early December, according to the National Park Service.

The public comment period, originally expected to end Friday, has now been extended through Dec. 4.
The park service’s Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which includes Ocean Beach and a number of other Bay Area sites, is considering a program that would require $35 permits for bonfires at Ocean Beach.

The beach is currently one of the few in the Bay Area where beachgoers are allowed to light fires, but park service officials said they have had problems with glass, alcohol and noise in the area.

In past years, park service officials have taken steps including the addition of fire rings, a greater law enforcement presence, an active monitoring program, and public outreach and education.

Park service officials are also considering restrictions on fires in winter to promote better air quality, as well as building more durable fire rings and developing a maintenance and outreach partnership with San Francisco’s Recreation and Park Department.

For more information or to submit a comment, click here.

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