Danyol Leon (left), a patient consultant at The Apothecarium, assists Kevin Clark at the dispensary’s new Castro neighborhood location Tuesday, October 11, 2016. (Dan Chambers/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Danyol Leon (left), a patient consultant at The Apothecarium, assists Kevin Clark at the dispensary’s new Castro neighborhood location Tuesday, October 11, 2016. (Dan Chambers/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Protesters aim to kill buzz around marijuana legalization

In what some may consider an ironic twist, a small group of marijuana advocates urged voters to snuff out the passage of Proposition 64, the California Marijuana Legalization Initiative, at a noontime rally at San Francisco City Hall on Monday.

Protesters said Prop. 64 lacks input from people who use marijuana for medical purposes. They believe there are too few protections for the compassionate use of marijuana for the chronically ill and disabled.

Shona Cochenaur, Axis of Love SF director, spoke to the small group of supporters outside City Hall about the lack of compassionate-use protections for marijuana for the chronically ill and disabled who may no longer be able to afford marijuana to manage their symptoms.

Protesters also believe Prop. 64 opens the way for the corporatization of “industrial hemp.” They contend a web of campaign committees, nonprofits and wealthy individuals have given as much a $6.6 million to legalize marijuana in California.

The legislation as written allows individuals to grow as many as six marijuana plants for their own use. The coalition contended it would not prohibit harsh legal penalties for the cultivation of larger amounts of marijuana

People would be allowed to buy and transport up to 28.5 grams of marijuana, with more allowed for those using it for medicinal purposes.

Marijuana would still not be allowed in public places unless local legislation authorized it. Use of marijuana would still be prohibited within a 1,000 feet of schools, daycare centers and other child-care facilities. Rules concerning driving under the influence are still being considered.election 2016MarijuanaProp. 64

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