Prosecutor: Reiser had time to kill wife, hide body

Oakland computer engineer Hans Reiser had a 55-hour window of opportunity to murder his estranged wife Nina and then hide her body, a prosecutor told jurors today.

In the second day of his lengthy opening statement in Reiser’s murder trial, Alameda County Deputy District Attorney Paul Hora said videotapes and receipts indicate that Nina Reiser, who was 31, checked out of the Berkeley Bowl grocery store in Berkeley just before 2 p.m. on Sept. 3, 2006, which was the last day she was seen alive.

Hora said phone records indicate that Nina called Hans from her cell phone at 2:04 p.m. and statements from the couple’s two children and her friends indicate that she then drove to the house at 6979 Exeter Drive in Oakland’s Montclair District where Hans Reiser shared with his mother.

Nina had custody for the first part of that weekend, which was Labor Day weekend, but was to give them to Hans around 2 p.m. on Sept. 3 so he could have them for the rest of the weekend, Hora said.

Hora said that it’s about a 20-minute drive from the Berkeley Bowl to the Exeter Drive residence, so Hans Reiser would have had from about 2:30 p.m. on Sept. 3 to 9 p.m. Sept. 5, when Nina Reiser was reported missing, to kill her and dispose of her body, Hora said.

Hora hasn’t yet explained to jurors how he thinks Hans Reiser might have killed her.

Nina Reiser’s body hasn’t been found despite extensive searches in the Oakland hills and other locations.

In October 2006 prosecutors charged Hans Reiser with murdering her after Oakland police said they found biological and trace evidence suggesting that she is dead as well as blood evidence tying him to her death. He’s being held in custody without bail.

The children, Rory, now 8, and Nio, now 6, were placed in foster care after Nina Reiser disappeared. They now live with Nina Reiser’s mother in Russia.

Hora disclosed for the first time today that Rory will return from Russia to testify at his father’s trial.

Nina Reiser, who was trained as a gynecologist in her native Russia, and Hans Reiser married in 1999 but separated in May 2004. They were undergoing contentious divorce proceedings at the time she disappeared but the divorce wasn’t finalized.

Nina Reiser was awarded both legal and physical custody of their children but Hans Reiser was allowed to have them one weeknight a week and every other weekend.

— Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted changes to The City's streets including Slow Streets closures to increase open space access and the Shared Spaces program, which allows businesses to use public right-of-ways for dining, retail and services. (Examiner illustration)
COVID is reshaping the streets of San Francisco

Walk down Page Street, which is closed to thru-traffic, and you might… Continue reading

At a rally in February, Monthanus Ratanapakdee, left, and Eric Lawson remember Vicha Ratanapakdee, an 84-year-old Thai man who died after he was pushed to the pavement in San Francisco. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/Examiner file photo)
The criminal justice system can’t fix what’s wrong in our community

My 87-year-old mother walks gingerly, slowly, deliberately, one step in front of… Continue reading

Superintendent Vincent Matthews said some students and families who want to return will not be able to do so at this time. “We truly wish we could reopen schools for everyone,” he said. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFUSD sets April reopening date after reaching tentative agreement with teachers union

San Francisco Unified School District has set April 12 as its reopening… Continue reading

José Victor Luna and Maria Anabella Ochoa, who cite health reasons for continuing distance learning, say they have been enjoying walking in Golden Gate Park with their daughters Jazmin, a first grader, and Jessica, a third grader. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Some SFUSD families prefer distance learning

Health issues, classroom uncertainties among reasons for staying home

Most Read