Proposition B: Retired officers have narrow win

A plan to keep retirement-age police officers working while allowing them to boost their retirement savings was winning voter approval, with 450 of 580 precincts reporting Tuesday night.

Over the next three years, Proposition B is expected to keep an estimated 200 officers in the department at less cost than recruiting and training new cadets, according to police union President Gary Delagnes, who helped raise about $300,000 to get the measure on the ballot.

The measure was expected to pass by a large margin, according to political analyst David Latterman, who added that it won nearly every endorsement in The City.

Officers have always been able to work beyond retirement age, but now they have a monetary incentive. An amount equal to their pension fund will go into an investment fund that would earn about 4 percent annually.

The Board of Supervisors would have a chance to review and renew — or cancel — the deferred-retirement program every three years.

bbegin@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLocal

Just Posted

Pharmacist Hank Chen is known for providing personalized service at Charlie’s Pharmacy in the Fillmore.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Left: A Walgreens at 300 Gough St. is among San Francisco stores closing.
Walgreens closures open the door for San Francisco’s neighborhood pharmacies

‘I think you’ll see more independents start to pop up’

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to city government on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City Councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco Councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City Councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto Councilmember Antonio Lopez.<ins> (Examiner illustration/Courtesy photos)</ins>
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>
How the vape king of teen nicotine addiction rose and fell in San Francisco

‘Hey, Juul, don’t let the door hit you on the way out’

Most Read