The home featured in the show "Full House," seen at 1709 Broderick St. in San Francisco, Calif. Friday, December 1, 2017. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

The home featured in the show "Full House," seen at 1709 Broderick St. in San Francisco, Calif. Friday, December 1, 2017. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Proposed renovations for home featured in ‘Full House’ draw ire of neighbors

This week’s Planning Commission may be a “Full House” when neighbors of the iconic Broderick Street home seen in the opening credits of a popular sitcom and its recent Netflix revival show up to oppose proposed renovations to the house.

In complaints filed with the Planning Department, several neighbors have taken issue with the renovations, which they contend are part of an effort to replicate the set of the popular TV show and would result in drawing more public attention to the residential neighborhood. Neighbors for years have lamented the home’s popularity as a tourist attraction and privacy concerns.

The home’s exterior was famously featured in the original “Full House” TV series, which ran from 1987 to 1995, and Netflix last year revived the show as “Fuller House.”

At least two neighbors have filed a request for a discretionary review hearing, scheduled to go before the Planning Commission on Thursday, in a bid to appeal the building permit sanctioning alterations to the house.

Jeff Franklin, producer of the TV series and the current owner of 1709 Broderick St., earlier this year obtained permits to construct a two-story bay window on the southern facade of the 134-year-old Victorian, as well as the addition of a second-floor rear deck and a rooftop deck.

The project also includes plans for modernizing the home’s floors, bathrooms, bedrooms and reconfiguring its kitchen and living areas, according to the Planning Department.

Franklin bought the vacant home last April, and announced then that he planned to use the house for filming and potentially renting it out to the public.

Among neighbors’ concerns are the building’s proposed use as a set for filming and short-term rentals, and that the proposed interior renovations aim to replicate the set of the TV show and could result in drawing more visitors to the neighborhood.

“[Franklin] is a Hollywood producer who has bought the house for commercial purposes — promoting it as a fan destination, using it for promotional events and filming at the house,” neighbor Carla Hashagan wrote, adding that the attention has “wreaked havoc on our neighborhood.”

Hashagan asserted that at peak times, the block is visited by “150-250 or more visitors and 50-75 cars per hour, with 1,000 visitors or more on weekend days.”

Franklin’s spokesperson Evette Davis said Friday that the producer is committed to working with neighbors to mitigate concerns.

She added that there are no current plans to use the house for short-term rentals.

While the house has always drawn fans and tourists to the residential neighborhood, the volume of visitors increased after Franklin purchased it, according to Davis.

Davis said Franklin has taken to social media to remind fans to be respectful of the neighborhood, as well as hired private security guards and worked with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency to install “no double parking” signs.

“We cannot deter tourists from visiting,” she said. “We genuinely tried what we could to help.”

Davis said the discretionary review hearing stems from the Planning Department’s failure to properly notify all of the home’s neighbors.

Planning Department spokesperson Candace SooHoo said when the department realized its error, “the department suspended the permit” and issued the appropropriate notifications retroactively. During that time, several of the neighbors filed for the discretionary review.

Davis called the proposed renovations “unremarkable,” and said they had no correlation with the TV show. The home, she said, is in need of seismic upgrades and has become a “liability.”

“The primary goal is to get the house put back together and likely seek some kind of sale,” she said. Planning

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