Proposed downtown tower would put San Francisco based Tandler family in real estate business

A local family-owned real estate company will construct its first building in The City if plans are approved today by the Planning Commission.

Fritzi Realty, co-owned by husband-and-wife team Bob and Valli Benesch Tandler, wants to build a 342-foot tower at 41 Tehama St., which now houses a parking lot and storage shed. The family has owned the site since it was the parking lot for the family’s former garment company, Bob Tandler said.

They had proposed building a 550-foot tower, which far exceeded the site’s height limits. But after area zoning was changed under the wide-reaching Transit Center District Plan, Fritzi Realty downsized its tower, which now falls just under the height limits for the area.

The plans call for 325 residential units and about 700 square feet of ground floor retail space. The site is nestled between a freeway off-ramp, Tehama Street and the future site of Oscar Park, a planned open space.

Tandler said that since the tower was designed with indoor bike storage and is located near the new Transbay Center, it will be a very transit-oriented development. The design for the building includes several levels of subterranean parking.

The architecture firm Arquitectonica designed the tower in the current proposal, Tandler said. It is the latest of several projects it has worked on in The City, including the Infinity condominiums and the proposed Trinity Plaza rebuild, according to the company’s website.

Tandler said the company was not sure yet whether it would manage the building or sell the property once it is developed.

“We have been totally focused on getting the project approved,” he said.

mbillings@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsdevelopmentLocalPlanningSan Francisco Planning CommissionTransit Center District Plan

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