Proposal revived to add new parking meters in eastern San Francisco neighborhoods

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerGrab quarters: Metered parking may be coming to Capp Street

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerGrab quarters: Metered parking may be coming to Capp Street

Talks are beginning to start up again over a controversial plan to install 5,000 parking meters in new San Francisco neighborhoods, nearly one year after the proposal was shelved following a harsh community pushback.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which oversees parking in The City, originally intended to install the new meters in the northeast Mission, Dogpatch, Mission Bay and Potrero Hill. Despite preliminary approval of the plan in January, the agency opted to delay installation of the meters in response to neighborhood concerns. Over the past 10 months, the agency has been collecting parking data and information about trends in the relevant neighborhoods.

Tonight, the agency will hold the first of a series of community meetings to gather feedback. The meeting, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at O’Connell High School on Folsom Street, will focus on the plans for the northeast Mission neighborhood.

Before shelving its plan, the Transportation Agency recommended adding hundreds of meters near 17th and Folsom streets, the site of a future city park. Spokesman Paul Rose said the agency will not make specific recommendations at tonight’s meeting, but the parking management plan for the neighborhood will include meters, residential permits and posted time limits.

The agency’s goal for the neighborhood is to manage parking demand and availability; improve access; and encourage the use of transit, biking and walking, Rose said. He also said that a key goal was maintaining parking availability for local businesses.

“This is the beginning of the next phase of an ongoing conversation,” he said.

But Doug MacNeil, owner of Spiral Binding, a book-repair shop on 16th and Harrison streets, said adding parking meters would hurt, not help local businesses. Most companies in the area specialize in manufacturing and repair, so high parking turnover is much less important than daylong availability for employees, he said.

“They don’t seem to understand that this isn’t a traditional commercial district,” MacNeil said. “Meters won’t help us out at all.”

Rose said the agency will gather feedback from the meeting and come back Jan. 19 with a parking management proposal for the northeast Mission community. Following that, similar outreach will occur in the Dogpatch, Mission Bay and Potrero Hill.

While the agency is set to spend the next several months gauging responses to its plans, some residents question the use of the community meetings.

“They hold these meetings, residents rail against the plans, and they still move forward with them,” said Mari Eliza, spokesman for Eastern Neighborhoods United Front, a group formed to oppose the proposals. “We usually end up getting completely ignored.”

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocalparking metersSan Francisco Municipal Transportation AgencyTransittransportation

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Dave Hodges, pastor at Zide Door, the Church of Entheogenic Plants that include marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms, holds some psychedelic mushrooms inside the Oakland church on Friday, July 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Psychedelic spirituality: Inside a growing Bay Area religious movement

‘They are guiding us into something ineffable’

A former inmate and a sheriff’s deputy are among the first four members chosen to serve on the newly created Sheriff’s Department Oversight Board. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Years after fight club scandal, Sheriff’s oversight board takes shape

‘We want to promote law enforcement best practices’

More than a thousand people gathered in front of the California Capitol building to protest Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay at home order and demand that the state re-open on May 1, 2020. (Photo by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters)
Newsom blames ‘right-wing pundits’ for COVID surge

By Emily Hoeven CalMatters Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday placed the blame… Continue reading

Strong California revenues will allow the state to commit to offering no-cost food to every student. (Amanda Mills/Pixnio)
How California plans to offer free daily meals to 6 million public school students

By Ali Tadayon EdSource With one in every six children facing hunger… Continue reading

Most Read