The legislation, introduced by Board of Supervisors President London Breed, would create interim zoning controls at new developments near Market Street and Van Ness Avenue. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

The legislation, introduced by Board of Supervisors President London Breed, would create interim zoning controls at new developments near Market Street and Van Ness Avenue. (Mira Laing/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Proposal cuts One Oak skyscraper parking nearly in half

A proposal to strip nearly half of the parking spaces from the luxury skyscraper project called One Oak is the latest to arise from weeks of negotiations between city officials, the developer and residents concerned about traffic impacts.

Board of Supervisors President London Breed has introduced legislation to temporarily limit parking at new developments near Market Street and Van Ness Avenue, including the One Oak project.

One Oak stands to lose 60 parking spaces the developer claimed it needed to finance the luxury skyscraper, reducing the number of parking spots from 136 to 76. The project is slated to have 304 condos.

SEE RELATED: Board delays vote on appeal of One Oak development

But, Breed could amend the legislation to exempt the One Oak project from the interim zoning controls as negotiations continue.

Breed said a neighborhood group is seeking additional community benefits from the developer in exchange for all of the parking. Breed did not offer further details on the community benefits.

“Developers come and go, and these buildings are sometimes not necessarily part of the community,” Breed said. “There ought to be some additional community benefits as much as possible with any of these developments.”

Michael Yarne, a partner with developer Build Inc., criticized the proposal.

Yarne said the developer “played by the rules” and received a special approval from the Planning Commission to include more parking than typically permitted under the neighborhood plan.

“Changing the Planning Code rules after a lawful and transparent entitlement approval is not sound planning policy and undermines the integrity of the Market-Octavia Plan,” Yarne said in a text message.

The legislation would create interim zoning controls for an area called the Market Street Hub. The legislation would limit the amount of parking spaces in a new development to a quarter of the number of apartments or condos in the project to align with the Market and Octavia Area Plan.

The One Oak project received conditional use authorization to have a parking-to-housing ratio of .45 rather than .25.

“This is not really just about One Oak,” Breed said. “This is about all of the projects that are coming to the area.”

The news comes just days before the Board of Supervisors will hear a California Environmental Quality Act appeal of the project from San Francisco State University professor Jason Henderson.

Henderson argued the city traffic analysis of the project was inadequate because it did not consider the impact of Uber and Lyft vehicles that will descend on the area once the skyscraper opens.

In negotiations with city officials and the developer, Henderson is calling for the Planning Department to consider ride-hailing data in future environmental impact reports.

Henderson is also asking for additional wind studies for bicyclists in the area.

But the appeal is not about parking limits. Still, Henderson said the interim zoning controls from Breed are “what we’ve been discussing all along.”

“These interim controls are just critically important to getting a grip on the oversaturation of cars,” Henderson said. “I’m very pleased to see this. I’ve been asking for it for years.”

The Board of Supervisors is scheduled to vote on the appeal Tuesday at 3 p.m.Planning

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