Prop. E seeks to limit ads on city property

Voters will decide Tuesday whether to restrict the number of advertisements on The City’s street furniture — kiosks, public toilets, benches and newspaper racks.

Proposition E would prohibit an increase in general-advertising signs on street furniture above what’s been allowed since Jan. 1, 2008.

Supporters of the measure say it will preserve the unique beauty of San Francisco and restrict “visual pollution.” Opponents say
the measure is anti-business and prevents San Francisco from benefiting from a healthy revenue stream.

The City generally contracts with private companies to provide public facilities — such as toilets and transit shelters — and authorizes those companies to sell advertising space on these structures.

“Restrictions on general advertising would affect the ability of some public agencies to generate additional revenue,” according to an analysis from the city controller. The Municipal Transportation Agency, which oversees Muni, collects about $15 million annually from advertising on transit shelters. It would not be able to expand the amount of advertising if the measure is approved.

The measure was placed on the ballot with four signatures of members of the Board of Supervisors: former Supervisor Jake McGoldrick, who introduced the measure, along with former supervisors Aaron Peskin and Gerardo Sandoval and current Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewselectionGovernment & PoliticsLocalPoliticsSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Diners at Teeth, a bar in the Mission District, on July 9, 2021. Teeth began using digital menus based on QR code technology in August. (Ulysses Ortega/The New York Times)
The football stadium at UC Berkeley, on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. George Kliavkoff, a former top executive at MGM Resorts International, took over the conference at the start of the month. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
What’s Ahead for the Pac-12? New commissioner weighs in

‘Every decision we make is up for discussion. There are no sacred cows.’

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

As the world reeled, tech titans supplied the tools that made life and work possible. Now the companies are awash in money and questions about what it means to win amid so much loss. (Nicolas Ortega/The New York Times)
How tech won the pandemic and now may never lose

By David Streitfeld New York Times In April 2020, with 2,000 Americans… Continue reading

Most Read