Prop. 1B funds to be used on city roads

A mile of the worst roads in San Mateo will be receiving a facelift in the next few years, thanks to $3 million in Proposition 1B funds earmarked for the damaged streets Monday night.

Although the streets slated for renovations make up just one half of 1 percent of all of San Mateo’s roadways, the 10 spots are each considered “failed” streets, having suffered from years of neglect, Senior Engineer Otis Chan said in a report to the San Mateo City Council. At Monday night’s City Council meeting, the group voted to designate the roadways as the priority for rehabilitation in coming years.

“There’s been enough damage to the actual pavement to itself that moisture is getting underneath and there is now a failure in the base material,” Public Works Director Larry Patterson said. “There are large areas of cracking, and that base material has been washed out.”

The streets are part of 24 miles of “failed” roads in San Mateo that have a Pavement Condition Index number of 30 or less, out of a possible 100, Chan said.

The 1.1 miles in question — to be paid for in two installments over the next three years — are at high-

traffic arterials and collectors.

After at least two decades of neglected improvements, Patterson said the city is working on improving more stretches of roadway each year while trying to stay cost-

effective.

Where the city once performed just 2½ miles of road improvements annually, Patterson said San Mateo has greatly improved that, although the city still has only a $3.5 million budget for the

maintenance.

“Now we’re able to do 20 to 30 miles of resurfacing annually, by attacking the ones that need the least maintenance,” he said. “But for these failed streets, we have to use this one-time funding.”

The work on the damaged streets will include complete replacement of the base materials of the road, upgraded drainage, new asphalt, concrete and striping. In some areas, sidewalks, curbs and gutters will be replaced.

Chan said the funds for the work must be spent within three years of allocation, but Patterson said he is confident the city will be able to move forward on the projects before their deadlines.

jgoldman@examiner.com  

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