Graffiti tagger Cozy Terry is allegedly responsible for the pictured vandalism at 2800-2850 Alemany Blvd. An injunction has been filed against Terry, barring her from tagging property in The City and from carrying graffiti vandalism tools. (courtesy sfcityattorney.org)

Graffiti tagger Cozy Terry is allegedly responsible for the pictured vandalism at 2800-2850 Alemany Blvd. An injunction has been filed against Terry, barring her from tagging property in The City and from carrying graffiti vandalism tools. (courtesy sfcityattorney.org)

‘Prolific’ graffiti tagger ordered away from Muni

A San Francisco Superior Court judge ordered an alleged graffiti tagger to stop damaging city property and restricted her access to Muni vehicles — her primary vandalism target, the City Attorney’s Office said Wednesday.

The motion follows an Aug. 14 complaint, filed by the City Attorney’s Office, that alleges Cozy Terry, of San Francisco, has caused more than $53,000 in damages to city property since late 2012, court records show.

“Terry is a prolific and unrepentant graffiti vandal who has so far been undeterred by laws or law enforcement,” City Attorney Dennis Herrera said in a statement. “Graffiti vandalism aims to victimize all of us by robbing public resources and befouling public services, by blighting our neighborhoods and betraying our laws.”

In court Wednesday, Judge James Robertson granted a motion from the City Attorney’s Office for a preliminary injunction against Terry, which prevents her from tagging property in The City and from carrying graffiti vandalism tools, court records show.

In total, Terry has allegedly racked up a bill of some $88,000 in damage to public property while tagging variations of the words “Coze, Coz and Coze One,” according to a press release from the City Attorney’s Office.

Her alleged targets have included Muni buses and a ticket kiosk, bus shelters, garage doors, murals, newspaper stands and vehicles, according to the August complaint. Terry’s alleged tags are often seen in the Outer Mission area, where she lives, near Alemany Boulevard and Geneva Avenue.

Terry was arrested by San Francisco police in 2012 and cited in 2013, on suspicion of graffiti vandalism, the complaint said. It’s unclear if the arrests resulted in convictions.

The City Attorney’s Office appears to have used Terry’s social media accounts as evidence against her.

The civil case against Cozy seeks $53,788.24 in damages and, if successful, could result in additional costs through funds or community service for the alleged tagger, the City Attorney’s Office said.

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