Project Homeless Connect event to focus on LGBT population

Mike Hendrickson/S.F. Examiner file photoMedical and dental care are among the services Project Homeless Connect offers.

Mike Hendrickson/S.F. Examiner file photoMedical and dental care are among the services Project Homeless Connect offers.

San Francisco will hold a Project Homeless Connect event Friday for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population.

The LGBTQ Connect event comes amid growing concerns that this community is increasingly more vulnerable in San Francisco as rents and evictions climb.

“LGBTQ homeless are a particularly vulnerable group,” said Kara Zordel, executive director of Project Homeless Connect. “They are often targets of verbal, physical and sexual abuse and because many shelters segregate their beds by sex, transgender individuals are often turned away or forced to live as the wrong gender.”

At Project Homeless Connect events, those without homes can benefit from an array of services including medical and dental care, as well as learn about other programs The City offers to combat homelessness.

Targeting the specific demographic is part of ongoing efforts to reduce the LGBT homeless population by 50 percent within five years. The efforts come as a homeless count last year found that 30 percent of people on the streets or in shelters identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender

The City's overall homeless population has remained mostly flat. Since 2005, the population has ranged between about 6,200 and 6,500, after dropping from 8,640 in 2002.

The LGBTQ Connect event is scheduled at the LGBT Community Center at 1800 Market St. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Bay Area NewshomelessLGBTProject Homeless Connect

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