Presidio Trust approves Gap founders’ art museum

Don and Doris Fisher’s private art collection took one step closer to becoming open to the public, after the Presidio Trust announced plans on Wednesday to move forward in development with the Gap Inc. founders on a contemporary art museum in the Presidio.

Pending the results of forthcoming environmental impact studies, construction on the museum could begin sometime in 2009, with museum doors opening as early as 2010, although many details of the project still must be finalized during that time period before it reaches final approval, Presidio Trust representative Dana Polk said.

The Presidio Trust elected to OK the Fisher’s museum proposal, dubbed the Contemporary Art Museum at the Presidio, in lieu of a competing plan proposed by the Presidio Historical Association for a museum that would detail the history of the former Army post.

The Fishers have pledged to provide all funding for the art museum, as well an investment of $10 million into upgrading the Presidio’s Parade Grounds. The PHA had no financing outlets identified for its proposal, a factor that played a large role in the trust’s decision to move forward with the Fishers’ proposal, Polk said.

“Don and Doris Fisher are thrilled and honored that the Presidio Trust accepted their proposal,” said Sam Singer, spokesman for the Gap Inc. founders. “They think it will be a benefit to the Presidio and San Francisco to have the world’s greatest private art collection visible to the public.”

The Presidio Trust also announced plans on Wednesday to begin development on a $5 million “heritage museum,” an interactive project that differs from the PHA’s proposal, but will incorporate aspects of the Presidio’s history. Polk said that funding for the project has already been appropriated in the trust’s five-year budget outlook, and that an advisory committee, slated to include members of the PHA, will be established to help steer the creation of the heritage museum.

“We think the heritage museum represents a great first step, a real advance over what they have now, which in reality, is nothing,” association President Gary Widman said. “But their proposal appears to be only a proposal to interpret the Presidio’s structures, and that tells a park visitor very little about American history.”

wreisman@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocalTransittransportation

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Charles Joseph, who is represented by the San Francisco Public Defender’s office, is facing deportation to Fiji. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Giving immigrants a second chance after incarceration

Legislation would allow some faced with deportation a chance to challenge their old convictions

The San Francisco Police Department released body camera footage of the alleged assault on Dacari Spiers. (Via SFPD Body Cam)
SF police officer to stand trial for assault over baton beating

A San Francisco police officer who prosecutors say unnecessarily beat a man… Continue reading

Mayor London Breed announced The City’s return to the red tier for COVID-19 precautions at Pier 39 on Tuesday<ins>, March 2, 2021</ins>. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
San Francisco enters red COVID tier, indoor dining to resume

Museums and gyms can reopen with capacity limits

Cole Odin Berggren, community programs director and drum and DJ instructor at Blue Bear School of Music in The City, holds a JackTrip device, which he says has greatly improved students’ experience of making music online. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
COVID-era musicians beginning to make connections

Software eliminates pesky delay plaguing most systems

Under the new plan, Twin Peaks Boulevard would be reserved exclusively for pedestrians and cyclists until Christmas Tree Point.	(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA board approves new plan for Twin Peaks Boulevard

Cuts vehicle-free space by half. Neighbors say crime, vandalism will still abound

Most Read