Pranksters post silly #MuniFacts posters on buses

Silly signs like "Lizardpeople must pay full fare" have been popping up on Muni buses across San Francisco in recent days. (Courtesy photo)

Silly signs like "Lizardpeople must pay full fare" have been popping up on Muni buses across San Francisco in recent days. (Courtesy photo)

“Lizardpeople Must Pay Full Fare” and “No Touching” aren’t actually Muni rules, but some merry pranksters are spreading signs saying exactly that on Muni buses across town.

The posters bear the logo of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which runs Muni, and the social media hashtag #MuniFacts. In social media photos, they can be seen placed in a poster frame that rests behind the driver on a Muni bus.

It’s unknown who is spread these posters on Muni buses, but the “lizardpeople” poster was covered by Muni Diaries recently, and a cursory read of social media shows a few more of the fake posters.

There is a MuniFacts Instagram account, but so far the user has not responded to requests for comment.

Some more recent #MuniFacts: “Fares May Be Paid By Cash, Clipper, or Magic Beans,” “No Touching,” “The Wheels on This Bus Do, In Fact, Go Round And Round (And Round And Round),” and because this is San Francisco, “This is a Gluten-Free Bus.”

The San Francisco Examiner asked SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose if the #MuniFacts sign “Cheeseburgers and Liquor Available Upon Request” was indeed accurate.

Rose responded, tongue-in-cheek, “Sorry, we follow a strict ‘we fly,’ ‘you buy’ policy.”

Darn. It was worth a shot.

Some #MuniFacts seen around town:

Finally, somewhere to spend my magic beans. ? #munifacts

A photo posted by Colleen Iris (@cleenrs) on Nov 24, 2016 at 11:23pm PST

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