Pot club among Jew family holdings

An Ocean Avenue building owned by the family of embattled Supervisor Ed Jew houses a medicinal marijuana dispensary, as a deadline nears for such facilities to obtain Health Department permits.

The NorCal cannabis club, at 1545 Ocean Ave., operates in a building owned by Howard and Anne Jew, according to city records. An employee at the club Tuesday confirmed that the club deals with Howard Jew, Ed Jew’s father, as a landlord.

Ed Jew is under investigation by federal authorities, and he has admitted accepting a $40,000 payment from the owners of several Quickly tapioca drink franchises. Jew told The Examiner the money was intended for a consultant whom he had recommended to help them obtain city permits.

The supervisor, elected to represent District 4 last November, has a long history of operating businesses with his family. Ed Jew and Howard Jew own and operate a Chinatown flower shop that has been in the family for generations. They also have collaborated on a travel agency and have a history of trading ownership of the many properties in the family, according to city records.

The ownership of a building housing a medicinal marijuana club, although legal, could create problems for the Jew family as legislation goes into effect at the end of June requiring permits for the operation of such dispensaries.

Under legislation passed by the Board of Supervisors on Nov. 30, 2005, cannabis clubs in San Francisco have until June 30 to obtain San Francisco Health Department permits.

Medical cannabis dispensary owners have complained that the June 30 deadline is unrealistic because of city permitting delays. On May 16, Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier introduced legislation that would extend the deadline.

“If they [the owners of the NorCal cannabis club] haven’t attempted to go through the permitting process, that ultimately becomes the problem of the property owner,” Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin said Wednesday.

On Wednesday, an employee at the NorCal dispensary refused to discuss any of the club’s business, citing confidentiality agreements between the dispensary, its patients and its suppliers.

There are more than 30 medicinal marijuana dispensaries operating in San Francisco. Even though the dispensaries are legal under California and San Francisco law, marijuana sale is not legal under federal law. The federal Drug Enforcement Agency has raided clubs in San Francisco as recently as last October, when agents raided one dispensary in San Francisco and five in Oakland.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation raided Ed Jew’s office and Chinatown flower shop Friday. Jew said they confiscated $20,000 from his safe, part of the $40,000 allegedly paid out by the Quickly owners.

Ed Jew’s properties

Property in San Francisco that is or was owned by Supervisor Ed Jew and his family:

» 118 Waverly Place

» 112-120 Waverly Place

» 1490 Newcomb Ave.

» 2626 Sutter St.

» 1107-1111 Ocean Ave.

» 2130-2134 Steiner St.

» 1679 32nd Ave.

» 12 Ross Alley

» 940 Jackson St.

» 1027-1029 Washington St.

» 2450 28th Ave.

» 1545 Ocean Ave.

» 266-268 11th Ave.

Property outside San Francisco:

» 2116 Roosevelt Ave., Burlingame

» 4213 E Sahuaro Drive, Phoenix, Ariz.

» 712 Eason Ave., Buckeye, Ariz.

» 9990 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale, Ariz.

» 4632 W Gail Drive, Chandler, Ariz.

– Source: Property records, mortgage records for San Francisco County, Madera County, Maricopa County.

amartin@examiner.com

Staff Writer Bonnie Eslinger contributed to this report.


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