Port Commission paves way for use of parking lots for Warriors arena

 

Port of San Francisco officials are paving the way for use of two parking lots near the waterfront associated with the proposed Warriors arena in Mission Bay.

The Port Commission on Tuesday approved plans to create a parking management strategy and finance plan, and perform an environmental review at two sites that will provide an additional 1,000 or so parking spaces for events at the arena.

The project, which includes an 18,000-seat arena, offices and open space at an 11-acre site at Third and 16th streets in Mission Bay, will seek approval from the Board of Supervisors Dec. 8 after gaining support from the board’s Budget and Finance Committee on Monday.

The sites include a 2-acre lot that could accommodate approximately 250 spaces near 19th and Illinois streets, and an up to 800-space temporary surface lot on the Western Pacific site just north of Pier 80 that will likely be used to help mitigate traffic impacts when large events at the arena overlap with games at nearby AT&T Park, an estimated nine times a year.

Monthly revenue to the Port from parking at the site near 19th and Illinois streets is estimated at $43,000, while the site near Pier 80 is expected to bring in $7,300 per event.

The Port does not have plans to develop either site, one of which is already used as a parking lot, according to a staff report prepared for Tuesday’s meeting.

“Developing [the sites] as surface parking lots would meet projected parking demand in the neighborhood and would put two underutilized sites into active production of new Port revenues,” the staff report reads.

The project’s final environmental impact report, released last month, also outlined some $60 million in various improvements that city officials are confident will mitigate traffic impacts from the arena.

The project, which has faced backlash in recent months from the Mission Bay Alliance group led by former UCSF officials who claim the arena will create detrimental traffic and noise in the area, also last month received crucial support from the university after city officials agreed to numerous transportation efforts aimed to relieve congestion around the new arena.

Improvements include the creation of a first-of-its-kind Local/Hospital Access Plan to ensure patients, residents and businesses don’t lose access to Mission Bay or UCSF during events, as well as adding parking control officers, purchasing four new light-rail vehicles, improving the T-Third light-rail line and constructing a center boarding platform at the stop near the arena to accommodate additional riders.

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