Political operatives turn themselves in

Three people linked to a pay-to-play bribery scheme linked to Mayor Ed Lee turned themselves into law enforcement Monday and were subsequently booked into County Jail, following the District Attorney’s Office announcement last week of corruption charges against them.

Keith Jackson, former San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education president, turned himself in 10 a.m. Monday at the District Attorney’s Office, the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department said.

Meanwhile, Human Rights Commission staffer Zula Jones and Commissioner Nazly Mojaher were taken into custody around 2 p.m. Monday.

Their arraignment dates have yet to be set.

On Friday, District Attorney George Gascon announced he had charged the three with “soliciting and accepting $20,000 in bribes from an undercover FBI agent in exchange for promised political access and preferential treatment in connection with city contracts.”

The charging documents were sealed as part of a federal protective order.

While the DA’s Office would not say what case the charges emerged from (a federal protective order gives them little wiggle room on the matter), some insiders are clear it’s the Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow case.

Documents released in August first named Jones and Mohajer in conjunction with allegations of campaign money laundering. Jackson had already been charged and was at the center of the case.

Curtis Briggs, whose August filing in the Chow case detailed the trio’s acts on behalf of Mayor Ed Lee, said that it’s obvious the new charges emerged from the Chow case.

In that instance, the pair, along with Jackson, were caught in an investigation into political corruption, according to records released in August. FBI wire taps recorded them speaking with an undercover FBI agent on how to launder campaign contributions so they could exceed legal limits. In exchange, the implicit understanding was that campaign contributions would be returned with preferential treatment.

Both women at the time were working to raise funds for Mayor Lee, who has denied any wrongdoing in connection to the case.

Jackson, who pleaded guilty to racketeering and other charges in a federal case against himself and former state Sen. Leland Yee, is set to be sentenced Feb. 10.

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BriberCrimeEd LeeGeorge GasconKeith JacksonLeland YeeNazly MohajerRaymond Shrimp Boy ChowSan Francisco JailZula Jones

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