Police report spike in break-ins at Pier 39

Tourists — and locals — beware: an increase in auto break-ins near Pier 39 have visitors to The City losing money, electronics and luggage.

According to the San Francisco Police Department, at least 10 break-ins have occurred so far Wednesday evening. Thieves have reportedly taken “everything” from cash, iPods, iPads and laptops.

Victims are all tourists from Germany, Australia and other foreign countries making a quick stop in San Francisco and leaving all belongings in the cars, according to police.

Police representatives said it seems many of the incidents have occurred in lots that do not have security guards, therefore making it easy for thieves to come in and break in without a hassle.

Tourists have not had the best experiences while visiting The City last month. On Aug. 9, a German tourist was shot by stray bullets while walking back to her hotel in Union Square. Two weeks later, a man from Sunnyvale and a woman from Redwood City were attacked on their second date at Coit Tower.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Follow The San Francisco Examiner’s crime blog, Law & Disorder, on Twitter @sflawdisorder. 

 

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