Police remain mum on fatal Redwood City shooting

Police released few details Sunday about a shooting that claimed the life of a Redwood City man.

Jeffrey Henderson, 49, was found shot dead shortly before midnight Thursday at the Broadway Towers apartments, located at 1107 Second Ave., according to a statement from Redwood City Police Department Sgt. Eric Stasiak. Initial reports pegged the death as a suicide, but police are now “definitely looking for a suspect,” Sgt. Alan Bailey said.

But officers are not releasing details about any possible suspects.

“The investigation has been a little on the hush side,” Bailey said.

When officers entered the apartment, they found Henderson dead on the floor from an apparent gunshot wound, according to Stasiak. No weapon was located at the scene. Coroners are still working to confirm the cause and manner of Henderson’s death, according to San Mateo County Deputy Coroner Jesse Busalacchi.

It isn’t clear whether Henderson was a resident at the building. His last known address is on McKinley Avenue, near Red Morton Park, according to voter records. Nobody answered the door at that address.

On-site property manager Melanie Medel said she was not contacted when the shooting occurred, adding that officials with the corporation that owns the building, Matteson Management, had told her almost nothing. Residents at Broadway Towers said Sunday they did not hear gunshots Thursday, nor were they aware anyone had died in the building.

Henderson’s death is the second shooting-related fatality in the Redwood City area in two weeks. Jamie Tejada, 22, was shot and killed at an apartment complex at 549 Hampshire Ave. on June 25. Broadway Towers is just two blocks from the Headquarters Bar, where 18-year-old Humberto Jesus Calderon Jr., 28-year-old Jesus Hernandez and 38-year-old Hemerenciano Mendoza were shot and killed April 16.

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