Police looking for suspect in 2 rape attacks

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO — Police officials are not ruling out the possibility that a recent early morning rape on South Linden Avenue and an attempted rape in Orange Park last September were committed by the same suspect.

On Wednesday morning, a 25-year-old South San Francisco woman was raped while walking to work on South Linden Avenue at 5:45 a.m.

A month and a half earlier, on Sept. 17, a woman using the restroom in Orange Memorial Park during the early morning hours fended off a man attempting to rape her.

South San Francisco Police are still looking for both suspects, said Cpl. Doug Smith.

“We’re not ruling out that (the latest suspect) is not him because that guy hasn’t been identified,” Smith said.

In the latest incident, the victim, while walking on the south side of South Linden Avenue near its intersection with Dollar Avenue, was grabbed from behind and forced into bushes where the suspect threatened to kill the victim if she didn’t have sex with him, police said.

The victim struggled and tried to talk to the suspect but couldn’t stop him from raping her, according to the police.

Descriptions of the suspect in Wednesday’s incident include: Spanish-speaking Hispanic male with Mexican accent, 25-30 years old, dark complexion and medium build.

At the time of the incident, the suspect was wearing a white ski mask and a dark green hooded sweatshirt with the word “Brooklyn” across the chest and a serpent or dragon in the logo.

Those with information should contact South San Francisco Police at (650) 877-8900.

dsmith@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

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