Police arrest two selling Muni transfers

Cops continue to corral crooks that hawk Muni transfers on city streets.

Two black-market bums were arrested selling stolen Muni transfers at 16th and Mission streets the morning of Sept. 12, police said. Officers seized 48 stolen transfers in the bust, police said.

The arrests follow the highly publicized busts in July of two more alleged crooks involved in illegal Muni transfer sales, including a Muni employee.

City officials have been ramping up efforts to bust this brand of crime. The rampant illegal sales of late-night transfers strip cash-crippled Muni of thousands of dollars each week, police said.

Passengers who pay the $2 fare on a bus or streetcar receive a transfer to continue riding without paying for 90 minutes. The late-night transfers allow riders to board buses and streetcars without paying beyond that time period.

City officials say it’s unconscionable that thieves rob Muni’s strained revenue streams while passengers pay higher fares for less service.</p>

“This is not a victimless crime,” San Francisco District Attorney Kamala Harris said in a statement.

In the statement, the District Attorney’s Office reminded the public that two suspects arrested in July for illegal transfer sales are facing a three-year state prison sentence.

One of the suspects, Edmund King, 52, works as a welder for Muni. King was allegedly supplying transfers to Leroy Gutierrez, 53, a known street seller, cops said.

King and Gutierrez were held to answer on the felony charges last week. The defendants are out of custody, prosecutors said.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

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