Police arrest two men in connection with jewelry store burglary

One of two suspects in a jewelry theft Thursday in San Francisco. (Courtesy SFPD)

One of two suspects in a jewelry theft Thursday in San Francisco. (Courtesy SFPD)

Police have arrested two men in connection with the theft of more than $500,000 worth of jewelry from a store in Union Square last week.

Andreaus Trevell Garrett, 24, and Carlnell McKinley Pitts, 27 — both San Francisco residents — allegedly broke into a jewelry store in 100 block of O’Farrell Street around 3:45 a.m. June 23 and stuffed jewelry cases into a duffel bag before fleeing.

Police said more than $500,000 in jewelry was taken, but co-owner of Grace Jewelry, Paul Zsou, said the amount was closer to $2 million.

The suspects were captured on surveillance images, and after the burglary patrol officers recognized the suspects from the images. Some of the stolen property was also recovered during the arrest of the suspects, police said.

One of two suspects in a jewelry theft Thursday in San Francisco. (Courtesy SFPD)
One of two suspects in a jewelry theft Thursday in San Francisco. (Courtesy SFPD)

Garrett was arrested on suspicion of second degree burglary, grand theft, possession of stolen property, conspiracy, carrying a concealed weapon and carrying a loaded firearm. Pitts was taken into custody on suspicion of second degree burglary, grand theft, possession of stolen property and conspiracy.

Additional details of the break-in from Zsou indicated at least one of the suspects might have been planning the crime.

According to Zsou, one suspect broke down a back door to the store accessed through the adjacent parking garage. Once inside the store, the man moved with purpose through the jewelry story in the early morning hours, breaking jewelry cases and removing necklaces, bracelets and rings.

He moved about the store as if he “knew exactly what he was doing,” carrying a sports bag and a hand cart, Zsou said.

“He was very selective and targeted,” he added.

Zsou, who said that his wife recognized the man, believes he has been in the store during open hours. “She recognized this guy.”

As he walked from case to case, breaking glass with the sledge hammer, said Zsou, the man was speaking to someone on his phone.

“So, he was talking to somebody,” said Zsou. “That’s why he left in a hurry.”

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Read more criminal justice news on the Crime Ink page in print. Follow us on Twitter: @sfcrimeinkBurglaryCrimejewelrySFPDtheftUnion Square

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