Plans for Bayview homeless shelter on hold, after request to withdraw funding application

Plans for a proposed homeless shelter in Bayview are being put on hold, as city officials on Tuesday sent a letter to the state’s Department of Housing and Community Development asking to withdraw the funding application for the 100-bed facility.

Trent Rhorer, director of The City’s Human Services Agency, in the letter cited “unanticipated cost increases” and other factors behind The City’s request to formally withdraw the funding application.

“We will continue to look for sites in the Bayview District to provide care and shelter for the homeless and intend to reapply for EHAP funding to support development once we identify a
suitable location,” Rhorer wrote in the letter.

The Board of Supervisors approved a state grant for the nearly $1 million proposed 2115 Jennings Ave. facility in 2013.

The proposal to transform a warehouse into a homeless facility came amid stiff debate. While department heads, homeless advocates and
operators of Mother Brown’s Kitchen in the Bayview backed the shelter plan, opposition came from business groups and Supervisor Malia Cohen, whose district included the site.

In a statement sent out Tuesday, Cohen said the plan for the facility was “flawed from its inception”

“For years, the Bayview community has been forced to carry a bulk of many of San Francisco supportive services and the idea to build a 100 bed shelter was another example of a unilateral decision made by the City that completely lacked any real community process or input,” Cohen said in the statement.

“The City has been working toward transitional and long term supportive housing options for years and I look forward to working with both the City and the community to identify real solutions that make sense for the community — this includes those that live in the Bayview neighborhood that are most in need,” she added.

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