Plan would smooth water for cruise terminal

Office buildings on San Francisco’s southeast waterfront could help bankroll a cruise terminal north of the Ferry Building under a new financing strategy due to be considered today by the Port Commission.

Elements of the project not involved with cruise ships would be shifted to a 13-acre site owned by the Port of San Francisco at Piers 30-32 at The Embarcadero and Bryant Street, currently used as a parking lot, under new plans scheduled to be discussed today.

State law mandates that development of publicly owned port land must be used for trust purposes of maritime-related “commerce, navigation and fisheries.” But legislation passed in 2001 to support a previous terminal project at Piers 30-32, which was eventually abandoned by the developer, gave some support to the concept of the non-trust office uses financing the trust use of the cruise-ship terminal, according to Port documents.

The legislation, which still mandated state and local approvals for the project, would likely have to be newly enacted or amended, according to the Port.

The Telegraph Hill Dwellers neighborhood group, which opposed a proposal to build the terminal along with a retail-office development at Piers 27-31, is likely to support the new proposal, because the non-cruise-ship elements are being moved to another location, according to spokeswoman Vedica Puri.

Port Executive Director Monique Moyer recently told reporters that the development of Piers 30-32 at South Beach could “solve an otherwise blight problem of the neighborhood” while generating an income stream for construction of the $100 million cruise-ship terminal. The Port struggles under a mandate that it be financially self-sufficient, because it has infrastructure and repair costs for its aging piers that total an estimated $1.9 billion.

San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau President Joe D’Alessandro said a new cruise terminal would float big-spending visitors to The City and create construction and hospitality jobs.

“Tourism is San Francisco’s No. 1 industry, and if we want to stay competitive we have to invest in the future,” D’Alessandro said Monday. “One area that’s really important to us is the positioning of San Francisco as a cruise destination.”

Cruise ships bring in $60 million of consumer spending annually, in addition to tax revenue and jobs, according to 2006 Port data.

Commissioners will be asked today to allow Shorenstein Properties and Farallon Capital Management to present draft plans for new offices and open space at the southern waterfront site and for a new cruise terminal at the northern site no later than September.

jupton@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Syd Mandelbaum created the home run tracker, which revolutionized statistics in major league sports. (Courtesy photo)
Home run tracker, with roots at Candlestick Park, marks 30 years

When Giants first baseman Brandon Belt slugged a solo home run in… Continue reading

Talika Fletcher, sister of Roger Allen, is consoled at a vigil to honor her brother, who was killed by Daly City Police on April 7, on Wednesday, April 14, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Supporters march for SF man killed by Daly City police

Struggle over fake gun ends in shooting of 44-year-old Roger Allen, DA says

Curfews on indoor dining have been lifted as The City continues to reopen business. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City to allow expanded indoor dining, limited indoor concerts and small conferences

With new COVID-19 cases remaining stable, San Francisco will continue to expand… Continue reading

Johnny Cueto P was the starting pitcher for the San Francisco Giants against the Cinnanti Reds, Wednesday. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli/Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Cueto leaves with injury as Giants take series from Reds

A latissimus dorsi injury to Johnny Cueto cast a dark cloud over… Continue reading

Tenants’ rights laws are often mysterious and written in language that confuses. (Shutterstock)
It’s not a good time to be a bad landlord

Tenant Relief Act, at last, is one positive thing for renters

Most Read