The Better Market Street Project, set to begin construction in 2020, intends to make the street more friendly for pedestrians, cyclists and transit. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

The Better Market Street Project, set to begin construction in 2020, intends to make the street more friendly for pedestrians, cyclists and transit. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Plan to ban cars on Market Street moves forward this month

A plan to ban private vehicles on Market Street is taking a small step forward this month as The City begins to survey transit riders and local businesses on how to roll it out.

A release of the draft environmental review for the project and the creation of a conceptual engineering report will also hit in late 2018 or early 2019, according to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.

In particular, merchants along Market Street who depend on loading zones will be surveyed by the SFMTA. The agency is finessing its more than $500 million plan to enhance transit and pedestrian access, utilities and more on the corridor.

Businesses need to “be vigilant” that the plan doesn’t create problems for loading goods, said Jim Lazarus, senior vice president for public policy at the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce.

“You’re always worried until you see the final product,” Lazarus said. “Some [businesses] don’t have any real access except on Market Street.”

While these may be seemingly small steps, the project has languished more than eight years, Supervisor Jane Kim noted in past San Francisco County Transportation Authority meetings.

The Better Market Street Project is a multi-agency effort to transform Market Street by banning private vehicles — but also by creating a transit, pedestrian and bike-friendly corridor. It’s slated to begin construction in 2020, according to the project’s planning documents, and spans Market Street from Octavia Street to The Embarcadero.

“I think we’ve accepted the fact there will be limited automobile traffic,” Lazarus said. The plan calls for wider bike lanes and sidewalks that planners wrote are for “streetlife zones.”

Door-to-door outreach to businesses and residents along Market will begin this month, according to the SFMTA.

The loading zones may be limited on Market Street for the car-free project, but Lazarus said some merchants have successfully used side streets instead.

“There clearly needs to be some truck traffic for moving vans, for accessing office buildings,” Lazarus said.Transit

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A sign about proposed development of the bluff at Thornton State Beach in Daly City on Friday, Feb. 26, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Retreat center proposed at popular state beach

Daly City residents oppose construction on ocean bluffs

Rev. Roland Gordon shows “The Great Cloud of Witnesses” collage mural at the Ingleside Presbyterian Church, which he began building in 1980.<ins> (</ins>
Rev. Roland Gordon preaches love in action

Pastor promotes peace, hope through art and prayer

Basketball (Shutterstock)
SI alum Begovich gets his moment, but Stanford falls on Senior Day

MAPLES PAVILION — Generally speaking, Stanford’s home finale on Saturday afternoon, a… Continue reading

U.S. Attorney David Anderson announces federal firearms charges against two men for their roles in a March 2019 shooting outside the Fillmore Heritage Center in a news conference alongside SFPD staff at the Phillip Burton Federal Building on Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Departing U.S. attorney predicts corruption probe will continue

David Anderson shook up City Hall as top federal prosecutor

Board of Supervisors President Shamann Walton, a former school board member, has been asked to help secure an agreement between the school district and teacher’s union. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
 <ins></ins>
Supervisor Walton tapped to mediate teacher contract talks

District and union at odds over hours in-person students should be in the classroom

Most Read