Pier 14 victim’s parents make appearance on O’Reilly Factor, back law targeting immigrants who are felons

In this Thursday, July 2, 2015 photo, Liz Sullivan, left, and Jim Steinle, right, parents of Kathryn Steinle, talk to members of the media outside their home in Pleasanton, Calif. (Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via AP)

In this Thursday, July 2, 2015 photo, Liz Sullivan, left, and Jim Steinle, right, parents of Kathryn Steinle, talk to members of the media outside their home in Pleasanton, Calif. (Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via AP)

The parents of slain 32-year-old Kathryn Steinle appeared Monday evening on the Fox television show the O’Reilly Factor and called for new laws to prevent killings like their daughter’s, which happened on Pier 14 earlier this month.

Steinle’s parents, James Steinle and Liz Sullivan told host Bill O’Reilly that while they are apolitical, they back the idea of a law that would keep repeat felon immigrants off the streets.

“We feel the federal, state and cities, their laws are here to protect us, but we feel that this particular set of circumstances and the people involved, the different agencies let us down,’ said James Steinle.

Sullivan went on to say “You just want it to be a good, solid law that won’t have holes in it. And I’m sure there will be lots of posturing back and forth. I had no idea how many people have been killed by illegal aliens…” she said. “We had no idea it was an issue. But something definitely needs to be done.”

Since the shooting, local and federal authorities have been pointing fingers at one another over who, if anyone, is responsible for what police have called a random shooting.

Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, a 45-year-old Mexican citizen who has been charged with the shooting death of Steinle, had been convicted numerous times of illegally entering the country. After being returned to San Francisco in March on an old marijuana charge, Lopez-Sanchez was released from County Jail despite requests by federal immigration authorities for the Sheriff’s Department to hold him

In addition, the gun used in the shooting was stolen from the car of a Bureau of Land Management agent.

City ordinances don’t allow such cooperation unless the inmate has been convicted of a violent felony and is facing a charges that involve a violent felony. That was not the case in Lopez-Sanchez’s case.

O’Reilly has his own take on the affair and voiced his opinions in a segment before the show, including his idea for what he is calling Kate’s Law.

In his Talking Points Commentary from July 9, O’Reilly called Steinle’s alleged killer a “despicable criminal” and said the “uber-liberal” ordinance that allowed his release from County Jail is responsible for her death. He also called Lopez-Sanchez a “drug pusher and addict” and a “low level thug.”

He went on to attack Mayor Ed Lee and Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi, who he called “hapless.”

While he has called the reaction to the slaying “politicized” O’Reilly started a petition, which he claims has been signed by 200,000 viewers, in order to have a law passed called Kate’s Law. The law would impose a five-year federal prison sentence on illegal immigrants who committee felonies and would impose lesser punishment for illegal immigrants who commit lesser crimes.
Bill O'ReillyCrimeJuan Francisco Lopez-SanchezKathryn Steinle

 

This image provided by Fox News Channel shows, host Bill O'Reilly speaking with James Steinle and Elizabeth Sullivan, parents of Kathryn Steinle, during an interview by satellite for "The O'Reilly Factor" on Monday, July 13, 2015. (Fox News Channel via AP)

This image provided by Fox News Channel shows, host Bill O'Reilly speaking with James Steinle and Elizabeth Sullivan, parents of Kathryn Steinle, during an interview by satellite for "The O'Reilly Factor" on Monday, July 13, 2015. (Fox News Channel via AP)

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