Photographer showcases warm tones, upscale ‘urban safari’ look

Photographer Tim Williamson and his wife, travel author Teresa Rodriguez Williamson, moved in to their six-landing SoMa loft a year ago.

The home is vertically stacked with one or two rooms on each floor — maximizing space in a narrow, downtown lot — yet the effect is anything but constrained.

“It’s like an Escher painting,” Tim Williamson says. “You go up into different dimensions,” describing the first-floor entry, office floor, kitchen level, third-floor living area, master-bedroom floor, sitting-area level and bar- and roof-deck level.

Floor-to-ceiling panes of glass, spiral staircases and a central shaft rise to a large 12-foot-by-12-foot skylight on the roof, which floods the home with light.

The home’s ultramodern look and mostly white walls contrast with rich, buttery textures, colorful rugs and vivid paintings with substantial frames.

“We make it both old and new,” Tim Williamson says, describing the design featuring traditional and modern
elements.

Los Angeles designer Gigi Rogers helped the couple decorate the house, which Tim Williamson calls “urban safari.”

The den features butterscotch-colored leather chairs and a dark-chocolate-patterned couch with richly decorated throw pillows. Rugs in kinetic motifs contrast well with clean wood floors.

In the living room, warm brown-leather chairs bring out a “robust gold and brownish-green” of the sofa, which sits amid tall plants, ornate carpets and collectibles from various travels.

One particular favorite of Tim Williamson’s is a painting of Gorky Park, purchased when he lived in Moscow.

Tim Williamson, who loves travel photography, has had work appear in National Geographic. He also just completed a shoot on Richard Branson’s private island. Previously, his work for major investment banks led him to create his own investment bank, Navitas Corporate Finance. — Elisabeth Laurence

Style keys

Design aesthetic: “Urban safari — I was born out of time. I like Humphrey Bogart, Frank Sinatra, safari from Paris to anywhere.”

Favorite color: Blue, although it’s not featured in the home.

Architectural magazines: None. “I read Vogue.”

Favorite room: Office. “It has both our desks. It’s set up to be extremely comfortable, cozy, intimate. We can watch the outdoors.”

Favorite object: Wood-carved horse and hand-painted tin.
 

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