PG&E pledges $100 million to San Bruno

The utility company whose pipe exploded Thursday, devastating an entire town, has pledged $100 million to help with any repairs.

PG&E announced it would give the city and residents of San Bruno $100 million to help rebuild homes and infrastructure destroyed by the fire.

According to PG&E officials the “Rebuild San Bruno Fund” comes with no strings attached, its goals are to provide immediate and short-term relief from incurred costs.

Around 6:15 p.m. Sept. 9, a 30-inch steel pipeline owned by PG&E ruptured near Glenview and Claremont drives in San Bruno causing a massive explosion. An estimated 37 homes were destroyed in the blast.

“We know that no amount of money can ever make up for what’s been lost,” PG&E Corporation Chairman, CEO and President Peter Darbee said in a released statement. “This program is just one piece of our promise that PG&E will live up to its commitment to help rebuild this community and help the people of San Bruno rebuild their lives.”

An initial $3 million check was already given to the city of San Bruno, according to PG&E. The utility company will also provide $15,000, $25,000 and $50,000 to homeowners depending on the extent of damage.

PG&E officials said residents are not being asked to waive any potential claims in order to receive these funds.

City officials declined to comment on the donated money saying rather they are focused on getting people back into their homes.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Check out a map of the condition of the houses affected by the explosion and subsequent fires, using data from the city of San Bruno.

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