PG&E hit with second lawsuit

A second person affected by the natural-gas line explosion in San Bruno has filed a class-action lawsuit asking for compensation and independent control of a relief fund created by PG&E.

One of PG&E’s 30-inch natural-gas lines exploded in a residential neighborhood of the Peninsula city Sept. 9. The blast and ensuing conflagration killed eight people, injured dozens and destroyed many homes.

The lawsuit filed Tuesday, pressed by San Bruno resident Daniele DiTrapani, is worded almost precisely as the first lawsuit filed, which was brought by another San Bruno resident.

Neither of the residents lost their homes in the fire or were injured.

Both lawsuits allege widespread harm to the community caused by the explosion of a 30-inch natural-gas transmission line owned and operated by the utility company.

The line — for reasons that have yet to be determined — blew up and caught fire. In the days after the explosion, PG&E created a $100 million Rebuild San Bruno Fund to compensate those who were affected by the catastrophe.

Both of the filed lawsuits have demanded that the fund be turned over to a court-supervised escrow account, so a third party can supervise the distribution of the money.

Also, the lawsuits accuse PG&E of negligence and creating a public nuisance.

“The threat from the PG&E Explosion for San Bruno continues today,” DiTrapani’s lawsuit reads. “Residents of the Crestmoor neighborhood have been contaminated by debris, ash, toxins and other chemicals as a result of the PG&E Explosion, thereby posing an environmental hazard to these individuals.”

Neither DiTrapani nor his attorney, Vahn Alexander of Los Angeles,  returned calls about the lawsuit.

PG&E is still reviewing the filings and would not comment on the specific allegations, company spokeswoman Katie Romans said.

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