PG&E employees to help 'Save the Bay'

Shorelines around the San Francisco Bay will be getting a facelift Saturday when Save the Bay volunteers restore vital wetlands and shoreline areas.

Joining Save the Bay volunteers will be nearly 100 Pacific Gas and Electric employees, according to the company. PG&E will also present the Save the Bay with $40,000 to help the non-profit organization continue to protect the Bay.

Three separate wetland areas will be restored this weekend, one each in Oakland, Palo Alto and San Rafael. According to PG&E, restoration will include removing non-native invasive plants and transplanting seedlings from Save the Bay's native plant nursery. This restoration is necessary to improve the natural bay habitat for invertebrates, birds and other wildlife.

“PG&E is one of Save the Bay's longest-standing and most-valued corporate partners, and shares our passion to protect vital native habitat,'' Andrea Geurts, Save the Bay's deputy director for community engagement, said in a statement. “We appreciate their continued support, which is essential to furthering our wetland restoration and education programs.''

Save the Bay, established in 1961, is the oldest and largest membership organization that works exclusively to protect and restore San Francisco Bay, according to PG&E.

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