Aaron Peskin meets with supporters outside his election party at Club Fugazi after defeating incumbent District 3 Supervisor Julie Christensen on Tuesday November 3, 2015. (Gabrielle Lurie/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Aaron Peskin meets with supporters outside his election party at Club Fugazi after defeating incumbent District 3 Supervisor Julie Christensen on Tuesday November 3, 2015. (Gabrielle Lurie/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Peskin on track to return to supes, Prop. F defeated

Aaron Peskin appears to have reclaimed the seat he once held on the Board of Supervisors between 2001 and 2009, defeating Mayor Ed Lee’s appointee Julie Christensen.

The victory of Peskin is a rather dramatic development in San Francisco politics, shifting the balance on the board to a progressive majority and ensuring the mayor will have a more challenging time during his second four-year term in pushing his political agenda.

For months, the two have waged intense well-funded campaigns over who will serve on the Board of Supervisors as the representative of District 3, which comprises Chinatown, North Beach, Russian Hill and the Polk Street area.

“Let me just say the following words, from the bottom of my heart: We did it,” Peskin told the crowd gathered at Club Fugazi in North Beach on election night.

By the time the votes were counted just after 10 pm, Peskin enjoyed a more than 1,100 vote lead. The Department of Elections still has to count more than 40,000 ballots cast citywide, but it seems unlikely Christensen could catch up.

MAYORS RACE
Ed Lee has prevailed in his bid for his second four-year term as Mayor of San Francisco. After raising more than $1 million and showing high popularity ratings in political polls, he scared off any viable candidate an ran virtually uncontested.

Five candidates ran campaigns against Lee. Amy Weiss, a founder of the nonprofit Neighbors Developing Divisadero, which helped revitalize Harding Theater and create a large community garden; writer “Broke-Ass” Stuart Schuffman, who is also a columnist for the San Francisco Examiner; Francisco Herrera, a community organizer and musician; Reed Martin, a technology designer, and Kent Graham, a retired hospital administrator.

Lee led the field of candidates, garnering 56 percent of the vote. Herrera came in second with 14.6 percent, followed by Amy Farrah Weiss (11.5 percent), Stuart Schuffman (9.48 percent), Kent Graham (4.74 percent) and Reed Martin (2.44 percent).

PROP. F FAILS
Home-sharing in San Francisco will not face stricter regulations, at least in the near future.

In a major victory for home-sharing companies like Airbnb, Proposition F, which would have capped nightly stays at 75 per year and allowed The City to fine Airbnb and other hosting websites for listing unregistered rentals, appears to have lost. Roughly 55 percent of voters said no to the measure, compared to 45 percent who supported it.

“I feel really good that the voters of San Francisco recognized that it wasn’t what it was purported to be,” said No on F’s Campaign Manager Patrick Hannan, who called Prop. F a “fairytale.”

Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, also thanked those who voted to not support the measure. “Because of you we won’t have neighbors spying on other neighbors,” Chiu told more than a hundred revelers at No on F’s election party inside South of Market’s Oasis nightclub. “City government will have millions of more dollars because of you.”

Written by Examiner reporters Joshua Sabatini, Laura Dudnick and Michael Barba

ADDITIONAL RESULTS

Proposition A, authorizing a $310 million housing bond to construct and preserve low- and middle-income homes in The City, garnered 74 percent of votes in favor of the measure, with 27 percent against it.

Proposition I, the suspension of market-rate development in the Mission District, fell with 57 percent in opposition and 43 percent in favor.

Proposition J, the creation of the Legacy Business Registry, earned 57 percent of the votes in favor of the measure, while 43 percent were against it.

Click here for more results from Tuesday’s election.Aaron PeskinEd LeeJulie ChristensenProp FProposition F

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