Peninsula Police Blotter: Neighborhood crime log

These are excerpts from Peninsula police departments' daily log of activities. Incidents are listed by city.

Foster City

Time-change mix-up: A welfare check was requested at 10:36 a.m. March 9 on Spruance Lane for an 80-year-old with dementia. The caller arrived to take her friend grocery shopping but no one answered the door, which was ajar. A resident check came up fine; the elderly woman did not realize the daylight-saving time change had taken place.

Her name is my name, too: A caller requested advice regarding unknowns sending her a credit letter at 1:42 p.m. March 11 on Juno Lane. The caller was being accused of using someone else’s credit who has the same name as her own. The caller was advised and an incident number was provided to caller.

Burlingame

Chipped off: A man with a car parked on the 1500 block of Howard Avenue next to street contractor workers came back to find the paint of his car chipped before 2:59 p.m. on March 11.

San Bruno

Not toying around: A man found a ball with suicidal threats written on it on the 400 block of San Mateo Avenue before 6:37 a.m. on March 11.

San Carlos

Scrap metal theft: At 10:44 a.m. March 10 officers responded to OK Machine Co. on a report of theft of scrap metal and fuel.

San Mateo

Nap time? At 5:22 p.m. March 8 in the unit block of North Kingston Street, a caller reported a subject lying in front of a store with a 2-year-old child.

Redwood City

Next-door noises: A neighbor called at 6:20 p.m. March 11 from Oregon Avenue when a man’s voice was heard on a cell phone in the neighbor’s yard. The neighbor’s residence is to the left of the reporting party. The caller said the residents are not home as their vehicles are not in the driveway.

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