Pedestrian struck, killed crossing intersection

A 63-year-old woman who usually dressed entirely in black was struck and killed by a car at an intersection that many residents say is dangerous but city officials last year deemed safe.

A vehicle struck Suzanne Leung, of San Bruno, while she was walking on a rainy Tuesday night at 6:50 p.m. on San Bruno and Easton avenues, police said. She died shortly afterward at San Francisco General Hospital, police said.

San Bruno police authorities said they have launched an investigation into the accident. The driver of the vehicle did stop after the fatal collision, Cmdr. Noreen Hanlon said, and the car is in police custody. Hanlon declined to describe the vehicle and said no arrests have been made.

Hanlon said she did not have a history of accidents at that intersection available Wednesday but that she remembered a fatal accident there about seven to eight years ago.

Last year, the city’s Traffic, Safety and Parking Committee considered installing a stoplight at the intersection, which has stop signs on Easton Avenue but not on San Bruno Avenue, after Silvia Araujo and other residents collected nearly 80 signatures on a petition calling for traffic measures, according to official city agenda reports.

City reports state that “staff looked at the area and found that physical construction solutions would not improve safety.” The committee and Public Works department planned to repave the area and put a fresh coat of paint and thermoplastic, which reflects headlights, on the sidewalks, according to reports.

City engineer Steve Davis, the lone spokesman for the committee, did not return calls for comment Wednesday.

Another petition for a stoplight will be coming shortly, Araujo said Wednesday.

Her brother, Miguel Araujo, owner of Araujo’s Restaurant on the corner of the intersection where Leung was hit, said the 25 mph speed limit on San Bruno Avenue is rarely obeyed.

“That’s not the first person who’s been hurt bad there,” said Araujo, whose son of the same name unsuccessfully ran for City Council in November.

Leung lived by herself in an apartment building on Easton Avenue just a few steps from where she was hit.

She was described as very quiet and accustomed to wearing “all black all the time,” said 20-year-old Chris Earhart, whose apartment is next to Leung’s. Her clothing at the time of the accident was not available from police or coroners Wednesday.

Anyone with information on the crash is asked to call San Bruno police at (650) 616-7100.

mrosenberg@examiner.com

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