Pedestrian fatality on Caltrain tracks delays train service

An unidentified man was struck and killed by a southbound Caltrain just north of the Menlo Park station Monday morning, snarling train service for several hours and canceling a special service train for baseball fans en route to the Giants’ season home opener.

The man was reportedly trespassing between Encinal and Glenwood avenues at about 8:30 a.m. when a Baby Bullet commuter train making limited stops slammed into him, Caltrain spokeswoman Christine Dunn said. He was killed instantly, becoming the fourth pedestrian fatality on Caltrain tracks this year.

Dunn said the man was struck far from a pedestrian crosswalk — in an area clearly marked off by long rows of trees that separate the tracks from a residential street. It was not immediately clear why or how he got in there, according to the San Mateo County Coroner’s Office.

“There was nothing at the scene to indicate a manner of death one way or the other,” said Coroner Robert Foucrault, who could not release the deceased man’s identity until his family was notified.

The incident halted all trains in both directions for up to two hours and canceled a special service train set to depart San Jose at 9:56 a.m. that was scheduled to carry San Francisco Giants fans to the afternoon game at AT&T Park, Dunn said.

“It’s just devastating,” she said. “On such a beautiful sunny day — the opening day of the Giants’ season — whatever the [reason he was on the tracks], this is just really sad.”

The incident was one of the Bay Area’s three train accidents Monday. About a half-hour earlier, 60-year-old Richmond resident Leon Greer Jr. was struck dead by an Amtrak train in Richmond.

An Altamont Commuter Express train nonfatally struck a pedestrian in the Livermore area at about 5:40 p.m., officials said.

The Caltrain fatality comes two weeks after a woman was struck and killed after trespassing in a narrow San Francisco tunnel near the 22nd Street station. Her identity has not been released.

Dunn said train fatalities are grim occurrences for all involved and particularly have an affect on the conductors. She said train conductors feel helpless when pedestrians end up in their path, unable to slow down the trains in time.

“The conductor is often the last person to see this individual alive,” Dunn said. “Sometimes these people will look the conductor right in the eye before they’re hit.”

maldax@examiner.com

Fatalities

Deaths on Caltrain tracks in past five years

» 2007: 8

» 2006: 17

» 2005: 10

» 2004: 9

» 2003: 10

Source: Caltrain

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden have taken different approaches to transit and infrastructure funding. <ins>(Yuri Gripas/Abaca Press/TNS)</ins>
Bay Area transit has big hopes for a Biden administration

The best chance for local agencies to get relief may be a change in federal leadership

BART Ambassadors are being called on to assist riders in social situations that don’t require police force. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Unarmed BART ambassadors program formalized with a focus on community service

Public safety and police reform are key elements in campaigns of Board members Dufty and Simon

East Bay hills and Port of Oakland visible from Point San Bruno Park jetty. (Shutterstock)
East Bay agencies urge precautionary evacuations ahead of wind event

At least two East Bay jurisdictions suggested Sunday that residents in the… Continue reading

Nate Durand of Chug Pub created an election-themed cocktail which has several names: Biden Harris, Barris, Hiden, and/or Dem Juice. (Saul Sugarman/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Drink blue, no matter who

But bar parties aren’t planned for Election Day

Lee Vining and Inyo National Forest are excellent fall color tour destinations. (Matt Johanson/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Gold Rush: Go now to see Sierra fall color

Maples, oaks, dogwoods, aspens glow in the next few weeks

Most Read