Pay cuts approved at CCSF; layoffs avoided

(S.F. Examiner file photo)

(S.F. Examiner file photo)

The 2,800 faculty and staff members at City College of San Francisco will have to take a 2 to 5 percent pay cut to help the struggling institution balance its budget, but layoffs were avoided in a budget approved Tuesday.

The $186 million operating budget was unanimously passed Tuesday by the board of trustees. It’s down roughly 4 percent from the $192 million budget of the previous year.

In addition to the pay cuts, which will save the school roughly $6 million per year, the budget eliminates 70 positions, reduces noninstructional spending by $875,000 and cuts 650 classes this semester.

Larry Kamer, a spokesman for CCSF, said the pay cuts are a combination of monetary reductions and furlough days that will affect all employees.

“The college worked within a lot of constraints on the employee’s side, but it did not resort to layoffs,” Kamer said.

“Staff reductions were achieved through attrition and doubling up. It’s time and money however you slice it, but that’s how they’ve done it.”

Alisa Messer, president of American Federation of Teachers Local 2121, said the union and its members agreed to the wage reductions.

“We’ve not had a raise in many years,” Messer said. “It’s not what we like to see, but the faculty stepped up because it’s our desire not to close the door on students.”

CCSF’s budget issues could change in November. The college, as with most educational institutions throughout California, is relying on Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax measure, known as Proposition 30, which would temporarily raise sales and income taxes to fund K-12 and higher education. Without it, even more drastic cuts will need to be made.

CCSF officials estimate another $10.3 million will need to be cut from the budget if Prop. 30 fails. However, the school is not relying solely on the state, as it also is asking San Francisco voters to approve a $79 parcel tax measure to provide dedicated funding.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area Newseducationhigher educationLocalSan Francisco

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