Parking measure losing out; 'Question Time' up in air

With only a smattering of votes counted, the fate of two competing ballot measures — A and H — is still up in the air, but initial numbers suggest that more Muni riders than drivers file absentee ballots. Measure A, which would provide more funding to The City's public transportation system and require The City to develop a climate action plan, captured 50.7 percent of the 44,472 absentee ballots filed before Election Day. Proposition H, which would increase the number of parking spaces in San Francisco, was losing, with 58 percent of voters rejecting the measure. Measure A also contains a provision that would fix the number of parking spaces to The City's current limits.

Measure E

Last November, 56 percent of San Francisco voters approved a measure in support of the idea of having The City’s mayor appear monthly at a Board of Supervisors meeting. Because the 2006 measure was advisory, Mayor Gavin Newsom has not attended any meetings this year. But this year’s version of the Question Time measure has teeth: It would change city law. Initial results reveal voters are divided — 51 percent were opposed.

Measure I

After the Board of Supervisors refused to fully fund a proposal for a Small Business Assistance Center during this summer's budget negotiations, Mayor Gavin Newsom put the money matter before the voters as Measure I. As planned, the one-stop shop would allow case managers to help merchants navigate such complex city processes as permitting, provide advice on how to bid on city contracts and make resource referrals, among other business assistance. Early voters agreed, with 56 percent supporting the idea and its $750,000 price tag. Together with the $150,000 that was approved by the Board of Supervisors, the center will cost $900,000.

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