Parents file claim after son’s death near Redwood City train tracks

The parents of a 34-year-old man whose death near the Redwood City train tracks in May remains an unsolved mystery have filed a $15 million claim for damages against San Mateo County and other public agencies.

Tim Singer was found lying near the tracks May 1 and later died. Authorities still aren’t sure whether he fell and hit his head, was hit by a train or was assaulted, said Sgt. Linda Gibbons of the sheriff’s office.

Singer, a Redwood City resident, had been drinking and was intoxicated before his death, Gibbons said. Responding officers originally thought he may have fallen, but a doctor at Stanford Hospital said the injuries to his head were “more consistent with blunt force trauma,” suggesting an assault, Gibbons said. Singer died on May 9.

Authorities treated the death as a homicide, but still have not found any eyewitnesses or motive for a potential killer.

“There is no evidence to support that he was assaulted,” Gibbons said, “but the lingering, unanswered question is, ‘Is there still a possibility it could be a homicide?’ Yes.”

Singer’s parents, Richard and Beverly Singer, filed the claim in October alleging negligence by the county and other public agencies. County supervisors rejected it last month.

The family’s attorney, John Kristensen, said the Singers filed the claim so they have an option to file a lawsuit later. Legal claims must be filed within six months of an incident.

Redwood City Attorney Pamela Thompson said the city “is confident that the police department responded timely and acted appropriately.” Scott Johnson, the county’s risk manager, said the county is investigating the claim.

Gibbons said the investigation is still open and she is reviewing the four-inch-thick case file for potential untapped leads.

sbishop@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocalRedwood CityTim Singer

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A health care worker receives one of the first COVID-19 vaccine doses at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital on Tuesday Dec. 15, 2020. (Courtesy SFgov)
SF to open three large sites for COVID-19 vaccinations

Breed: ‘We need more doses. We are asking for more doses’

Tongo Eisen-Martin, a Bernal Heights resident, named San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Tongo Eisen-Martin becomes San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate

Bernal Heights resident Tongo Eisen-Martin has become San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate.… Continue reading

Homeless people's tents can be seen on Golden Gate Avenue in the Tenderloin on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 16, 2020. (Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong/S.F. Examiner)
Statewide business tax could bring new funds to combat homelessness

San Francisco could get more than $100 million a year for housing, rental assistance, shelter beds

The Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco (a mural by artist Jamie Treacy is pictued) has a lineup of free online programming including activities for youngsters scheduled for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 18. (Courtesy Demetri Broxton/Museum of the African Diaspora)
Stanford, Museum of the African Diaspora host MLK Day activities

Online offerings include films, music, discussion

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi presides the US House of Representatives vote on the impeachment of US President Donald Trump at the US Capitol, January 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. - The Democrat-controlled US House of Representatives on January 13 opened debate on a historic second impeachment of President Donald Trump over his supporters' attack of the Capitol that left five dead. (SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
House votes 232-197 to impeach Trump a second time

Focus shifts to Senate, where McConnell has signaled he may not stand by president

Most Read