Panel cites pluses of organic food in schools, facilities

Touting the benefits of organic foods, a City Hall committee is pondering ways to ensure that schools and city facilities go organic with their food service.

While The City has adopted various policies advocating more organic or sustainable food supplies in its food service, implementation is still being hashed out. The Environmental Commission has endorsed the goal of having 20 percent of all city facilities, including schools, serve locally grown and organic foods within the next seven years.

Any food service, from the cafeteria at City Hall to jails and hospitals, may one day serve mostlyorganic or sustainable foods, which are considered more nutritious for the consumer.

The City’s Environmental Policy Committee has invited prominent organic food advocates to a forum Monday in a move to hash out a plan to realize that goal.

“Ultimately it will probably boil down to us creating a resolution” detailing an implementation plan for a vote by the Board of Supervisors, said Angelo King, a city environmental commissioner.

One possibility, he said, is to stipulate in future city contracts with food vendors that they use organic products.

One of the most challenging aspects of using more organic products is the cost, which is considerably higher than other foods. Using pesticides saves more of the crop, which keeps costs down, King said.

The City’s Health Commission will develop a plan this year on “increasing sustainable products of food in the food purchasing and food service” at Laguna Honda and San Francisco General hospitals, according to Christina Carpenter, health consultant with the Department of Public Health.

Carpenter said the industry is not yet prepared to realize this goal, adding that the hospitals’ food distributor is not equipped to incorporate organic food on “any grand scale.”

Anya Fernald, director of California Alliance of Family Farmers, said any increase in consumption of organic foods would go a long way toward helping out Bay Area farmers, who “really are a dying breed.”

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Construction in the Better Market Street Project between Fifth and Eighth streets is expected to break ground in mid-2021.<ins></ins>
SFMTA board to vote on Better Market Street changes

Agency seeks to make up for slimmed-down plan with traffic safety improvements

Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Currey (30) tallied 26 points and seven assists at Monday night’s game against the Lakers. (Chris Victorio for the S.F. Examiner).
Warriors overcome 19-point deficit to stun defending-champion Lakers 115-113

Ladies and gentlemen, the Golden State Warriors are officially back. Stephen Curry… Continue reading

U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris speaks during an event to name President-elect Joe Biden’s economic team at the Queen Theater on Dec. 1, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (Alex Wong/Getty Images/TNS)
Kamala Harris to resign from Senate

Bridget Bowman CQ-Roll Call Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will resign from the… Continue reading

A view of Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
CCSF begins search for next chancellor amid new challenges

‘It’s arguably the biggest single responsibility the board has,’ trustee says

Some people are concerned that University of California, San Francisco’s expansion at its Parnassus campus could cause an undesirable increase in the number of riders on Muni’s N-Judah line.<ins></ins>
Will UCSF’s $20 million pledge to SFMTA offset traffic woes?

An even more crowded N-Judah plus increased congestion ahead cause concern

Most Read