People walk the main grounds of the Lands End area on day one of the 2018 Outside Lands Festival at San Francisco's Golden Gate Park on Friday, August 10, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

People walk the main grounds of the Lands End area on day one of the 2018 Outside Lands Festival at San Francisco's Golden Gate Park on Friday, August 10, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Outside Lands contract set to be extended through 2031

San Francisco and music promoter Another Planet Entertainment have negotiated a deal that would allow Outside Lands to continue until 2031.

Another Planet has put on the three-day annual musical festival in Golden Gate Park since 2008 under an agreement that is set to expire in 2021, and is now asking for an extension.

Dana Ketcham, Rec and Park’s director of property management, said in a memo that “the amendment retains the basic terms of the existing contract but updates it for cost of living increases” and that it raises the minimum rent “to provide greater budgetary certainty for the Department.”

Supervisor Sandra Fewer, who represents the Richmond, whose residents are most impacted by the event, said feedback from community meetings was incorporated in the deal, such as increasing the amount of money that would go to the neighborhood for public improvements.

“I think we’ve come to a good agreement,” Fewer said.

The event has resulted in $3.2 million in rent payments to The City this year and a total of $23 million since 2008.

The existing permit caps the minimum rent payment at $1.4 million. Under the proposal, the minimum permit fee would increase to $2.5 million starting in 2019, and by $75,000 each year after that.

The department also is entitled to additional rent through fees per ticket sold. The existing $1.25 fee on each ticket sold would remain for next year, but then increase to $1.50 in 2020, $1.75 in 2024 and $2 in 2028.

Another Planet has effectively responded to concerns over traffic and noise over the years, Ketcham said in the memo. Noise complaints in 2011 totaled 384, declining to 46 in 2015.

However there was a spike in complaints this year, particularly from the Sunset District. “The permittee responded to the 2018 sound complaints received and complaints went from 118 on Friday to 63 on Saturday to 31 on Sunday,” the memo said.

Traffic complaints have also declined, from 65 in 2011 to 16 this year.

“The Department negotiated this extension in light of the significant efforts that Another Planet has taken to continue to address community concerns, the extensive knowledge it has garnered in safely and responsibly hosting large concerts in such a sensitive environment, the significant public awareness and following of Outside Lands and the financial success that the event now experiences,” the memo said.

Fewer said that for residents, “I don’t think it’s so much of an issue as it was years ago.”

In making its case for the deal, the memo states that “the event has drawn over 2 million visitors to Golden Gate Park and contributes an estimated $66 million annually to the City’s economy.”

The Recreation and Park Commission Operations Committee will vote on the deal at 2 p.m. Thursday, at City Hall in Room 416. The Board of Supervisors will also need to approve the contract change.

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