O’Reilly slams Supervisor Malia Cohen for Sanctuary City immigration policy

Supervisor Malia Cohen featured on the O'Reilly factor.

Supervisor Malia Cohen featured on the O'Reilly factor.

On Guard column header Joe

San Francisco’s least favorite conservative mouthpiece is mouthing off again, and this time, Bill O’Reilly is targeting Supervisor Malia Cohen.

And what did the Bayview and Potrero Hill neighborhood supervisor do to get on the drooling old-man’s bad side?

She stood up for immigrants in the face of insanity.

As the Examiner has covered, the Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to affirm The City’s Sanctuary City laws, in a blow to conservatives who wanted to re-write immigrant protections in the wake of Kate Steinle’s death. Sadly, if you’ll recall, she was allegedly killed by a gunshot from Juan Francisco-Lopez Sanchez, an undocumented immigrant released from county jail.

But as Cohen so eloquently pointed out at the board meeting, though Steinle’s death was unfortunate, and awful, one incident does not wipe away a quarter-century of safer immigrant communities – made possible by an effective law.

“We cannot allow one event to dictate twenty five years — twenty five years of our city’s policies towards undocumented immigrants in our city,” she said at the board. “And more importantly, more importantly, we cannot allow hateful conservative news stations to drive how we respond to incidents in our city. I’m not afraid of Fox News and they don’t influence how I make my policy decisions here in San Francisco.”

On the O’Reilly factor last night, the blithering conservative pinhead (to use his choice in words) blasted Cohen by name.

Above, O’Reilly’s segment on Sanctuary City.

“That woman is a disgrace, and if I were the attorney general of the United States, I would immediately place her under arrest,” he said. “I might not win the case, but I would send a message to all subversive office holders in this country, that if you do not obey federal law, you yourself will be prosecuted.”

He calls San Francisco “hopeless” for releasing a seven-time felon, completely glossing over the fact that none of those felonies were violent – if they were violent, that would dictate different action on the part of San Francisco.

Of course, glossing over facts is the usual O’Reilly method – “pinhead,” indeed.

Thankfully, O’Reilly isn’t attorney general, or even a low level-political flunky. He’s just a mouthpiece, and a poor one at that.

Cohen declined to comment, saying “Responding to these comments would take away from the issue and set up a philosophical fight, separate from the real policy issue at hand. I do not see the benefit in continuing the debate.”

On Guard prints the news and raises hell each week. Email him at joe@sfexaminer.com.Bill O'Reillysanctuary citySupervisor Malia Cohen

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