Ogden Terrace garden is getting rid of old fence

A retaining wall made out of railroad beams at the 45-plot Ogden Terrace Community Garden is on the verge of collapse but may be fixed soon.

The garden in Bernal Heights was made wheelchair-accessible and half the wall was fixed a few years ago through a donation from the San Francisco Conservation Corps, said garden manager Vincent Leddy.

However, the funding ran dry and the lower half still needs to be replaced.

Now the conservation corps is again donating $80,000 – a similar amount to the first donation – to finish the job, but because it’s a large amount of money, the Board of Supervisors has to approve it first.

Leddy said this garden has about 10 people on its waiting list who will likely be waiting for a year before getting a plot, but that's not as intimidating as some other wait lists.
 

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